LES MOORE COOLS OFF, HEATS UP THE POOL

LES MOORE COOLS OFF, HEATS UP THE POOL


Age: 18

High school: American Heritage

College: University of Tampa

WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

Les Moore was just looking for a way to stay cool.

“I have bad problems dealing with the heat,” Moore explained. “When I played soccer I would be as red as a cherry. I tried tennis and it wouldn’t go away. I had bad reactions.”

His parents decided to sign him up for swimming. He started with a small group of five kids and one coach in a small pool.

“It was strictly recreational but I basically learned the mechanics,” Moore said.

Since then, the Fort Lauderdale-born swimmer of British descent has been swimming for 12 years at a high level. He joined the Coral Springs Swim Club in sixth grade and quickly progressed at the club and high school level.

“The sport helped me manage my time as I got older,” Moore said. “I am not the typical teenager. Sometimes I slack on homework. Swimming helped me with dedication. When I am not at school or swimming I am a complete bum, chilling around with friends, sitting in front of a computer or relaxing.

“If I didn’t have the sport to keep me busy I would be the kid at home that didn’t do anything every day,” Moore said. “Swimming keeps me extremely focused.”

Moore competes in most of the sport’s events including the 200 and 400 individual medley, 100 butterfly and 200 freestyle.

Some of his most memorable moments came in high school swimming while competing at the Class A level, the state’s most competitive.

“It was a mixture of emotions for me,” Moore said. “Last November at states I was disappointed and extremely happy as well. I came in second by absolutely nothing. At the same time, I was thinking I could have gotten first. I was first until the last turn at the wall. Had I not gotten sloppy at the end I would have won.

“But I also thought I wasn’t going to focus on the negatives. I swam my best times and finished second at states in one of my best performances. I am sure I have other swims out there more memorable but that was the peak of my high school career. That will be the last thing I remember high school-wise.”

Moore hopes to swim in college but after that he will think long and hard about continuing.

“I don’t have to be an Olympian to be a great swimmer,” Moore said. “To be completely honest I may not swim past college. The other part of being a great swimmer is realizing when is a good time to stop. There are older Olympians out there who should really move on and get a job.

“When I am done with college if I am at the brink of making an Olympic trial cut and becoming one of the top swimmers that would be a completely different story. But if it doesn’t happen I want to put my priorities straight, find a job and take care of myself. I can’t go home to mom and dad, keep training and think everything is going to be okay. That’s not fair to my parents.”

Moore, who plans to major in international business, said he made sacrifices for swimming but has no regrets.

“I missed out on a lot of social activities, I was always known as the swimming kid,” Moore said. “I went to my first prom after-party ever and everyone was surprised to see me.

“I sacrificed a lot of my spare time. Swimming has been so tied into my life but when you sacrifice something you gain something else.

“Thanks to swimming I made quite a few friends, I am in great physical shape and it makes me happy mentally when I am swimming. I am always pushing myself. I am never satisfied.”

Training with the Coral Springs Swim Club has been the difference for Moore, he said.

“I know I can swim faster especially when somebody next to you is older and more mature,” Moore said. “It’s definitely an advantage swimming with Coach Lohberg.”

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

http://www.csscswim.com

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SOFLO SUCCESS CONTINUES ON FINAL DAY WITH THREE HIGH POINT AWARD WINNERS

SOFLO SUCCESS CONTINUES ON FINAL DAY WITH THREE HIGH POINT AWARD WINNERS


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS—South Florida Aquatic Club continued its success on the final day of the Patriot Aquatics Long Course Invitational at the Lake Brantley Aquatic Center.

SOFLO finished the Florida Swimming-sanctioned three-day meet on a winning note on Sunday.

Marco Hosfeld and Emma Lincoln captured individual events and along with Eden Cooke won high point awards in their respective age groups.

Hosfeld, 14, won the boys’ 13-14 200-meter boys’ backstroke in 2:26.61. Teammate August Charni was eighth in 2:39.57 in the same event.

Hosfeld was also second in the 50-meter freestyle in 26.76.

Emma Lincoln, 14, won the 50-meter freestyle in 29.10.

Cooke, 10, had a pair of seconds. She was second in the 100-meter backstroke in 1:24.72 and second in the 50-meter freestyle in 32.19.

Audrey Mason was second in the 11-12 100-meter breaststroke in 1:29.64.

Brandon Goldman, 15, was third in the 200-meter backstroke in 2:21.90 and Anne Kuczynski was third in the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:57.17.

Gus Cohn, 9, was fourth in the boys’ 10-and-under 100-meter breaststroke in 1:37.38

Jenna Moodie, 14, was fifth in the 200-meter breaststroke in 3:04.01.

Catharine Cooper, 10,  was sixth in 10-and-under 100 backstroke in 1:30.21

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

 http://www.csscswim.com

http://www.swim4comets.com

SOFLO SUCCESS CONTINUES ON FINAL DAY

SOFLO SUCCESS CONTINUES ON FINAL DAY


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS—South Florida Aquatic Club continued its success on the final day of the Patriot Aquatics Long Course Invitational at the Lake Brantley Aquatic Center.

SOFLO finished the Florida Swimming-sanctioned three-day meet on a winning note on Sunday.

Marco Hosfeld and Emma Lincoln captured individual events.

Hosfeld, 14, won the boys’ 13-14 200-meter boys’ backstroke in 2:26.61. Teammate August Charni was eighth in 2:39.57 in the same event.

Hosfeld was also second in the 50-meter freestyle in 26.76.

Emma Lincoln, 14, won the 50-meter freestyle in 29.10.

Eden Cooke, 10, had a pair of seconds. She was second in the 100-meter backstroke in 1:24.72 and second in the 50-meter freestyle in 32.19.

Brandon Goldman, 15, was third in the 200-meter backstroke in 2:21.90 and Anne Kuczynski was third in the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:57.17.

Gus Cohn, 9, was fourth in the boys’ 10-and-under 100-meter breaststroke in 1:37.38

Jenna Moodie, 14, was fifth in the 200-meter breaststroke in 3:04.01.

Catharine Cooper, 10,  was sixth in 10-and-under 100 backstroke in 1:30.21

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

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TYLA MARTIN ON SWIMMING’S FAST TRACK; SWANSON WINS, HAS TWO BIG TIME DROPS

TYLA MARTIN ON SWIMMING’S FAST TRACK; SWANSON WINS, HAS TWO BIG TIME DROPS


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

PEMBROKE PINES—Tyla Martin wrapped a bright orange and pink towel around her and stared intently at her lane as she sat behind the starting block waiting for her next race.

With talent and poise, the bubbly 12-year-old is focused on moving up the swimming ladder.

After only four years in competitive swimming, her progress has been remarkable. The South Florida Aquatic Club swimmer is still cloudwalking after dominating last month’s CARIFTA Swimming Championships in Jamaica.

Representing Trinidad and Tobago in her first major international meet, the national record holder carved out a place in history with nine individual gold, three relay gold and silver medals. She broke her own national records, earned the 11-12 high point award and led Trinidad and Tobago to the team title.

Martin returned to South Florida motivated more than ever for the next step in what promises to be an outstanding future.

On Sunday, under the watchful eye of six-time Olympic coach Michael Lohberg, Martin won the 50-meter backstroke in 35.20, 100-meter breaststroke in 1:26.87 and 100-meter freestyle in 1:05.60 on the final day of the Florida Gold Coast Invitational at the Academic Village Pool.

Martin also anchored SOFLO’s winning 200-meter freestyle relay that won in 2:09.86.

“I was excited before CARIFTA because I swam well at JOs and I thought I was very well-prepared,” said Martin, who started swimming recreationally at the Boca Raton YMCA five years ago.

Despite her young age, she has learned to handle the attention she is getting on and off the pool deck. She was one of the most popular swimmers at CARIFTA. On Sunday, her SOFLO teammates were excited that she was swimming the relay.

“I think with each race at CARIFTA I got more adapted to the crowd noise and everyone being around,” Martin said.

“As the meet went on I did better, my nerves went down and I got calmer. I was surprised at some of my races at how I did. I liked how I swam and I liked my times.”

By joining Lohberg’s group, Martin has moved to the next level.

“Now that I am in his group I get to focus more on technique and how to swim a race,” she said. “I get to focus on the little things before I do the big things. I think I am ready now to train a lot harder.

“Having him here was a combination of everything, scary and fun. I wanted to hear what he had to say about my races and how he thought I did and stuff. I liked his input. It was good.”

It was the first meet that Lohberg coached Martin, one of five swimmers who moved from age group coach Bruno Darzi’s group to Lohberg’s senior group.

“What my job is now is to slowly change the training style from a kid-level to a teenager level,” Lohberg said.

“That means there is fine-tuning of the strokes, more aerobic work, more intellectual focus when it comes to the drills that they have to pick up and learn. Sometimes that comes a little bit at the expense of spectacular times because they train differently.

“That’s another thing they have to learn that the objectives in races are different. It’s just not about the times. Sometimes it’s stroke, it’s turns, splitting and technical parts.

“The focus shifts from times-only to technical things because the next three years is basically the time they have to learn everything they  have to know when they are competitive, hopefully on the high level. When they are 15, they need to be ready. They need to know what to do and have all the tricks available.”

Lohberg said Martin is easy to work with and eager to learn.

“All five of them are eager to learn,” Lohberg said. “We had a couple sessions where five-time Olympian Dara Torres came by and coached. That gave them a real kick forward. They really pay attention and are a pleasure to work with. They are like a sponge. Anything you throw at them they soak it in and want to do it. They are young, excited and mentally fresh and that is really easy to work with.”

Martin has a full summer schedule of U.S. and Caribbean meets lined up. She was invited to a Kentucky training camp next week. After that it will be Junior Olympics, Zones and another meet in the Caribbean.

“I think all of this is good experience for me,” said Martin, who gave up gymnastics, basketball, ice skating, dance, soccer and ballet for swimming. “I stayed with swimming because I was good at it. I am making so many friends and having these amazing experiences going to meets.

“I established myself at CARIFTA and that motivates me because I have a country that I am representing,” said Martin, who turns 13 on July 7. “I want to do good and I am ready to do good. The Olympics are a goal that I want to get to and hopefully soon. Whether it’s 2012 or 2016, I am definitely thinking about that when I train and go to all these meets.”

Lohberg said the international exposure she is getting is invaluable.

“I want her to do the Caribbean meets because she can establish herself on the national team and that opens the door later for the Olympics and World Championships and that’s what it’s about,” Lohberg said. “It’s an experience that’s unbelievable and I will do everything I can to get her there.”

At age 12, Lohberg said it’s hard to predict her future because of physical changes but the potential is there.

“With what she has been doing so far, I think the sky is the limit,” Lohberg said. “I think she will definitely be one of the best swimmers in the Caribbean and as she continues in the age groups, she could be one of the dominant forces in female swimming in the Caribbean and hopefully even on a higher level. It will be fun and that’s what I am looking forward to.”

Another impressive performance on Sunday was SOFLO 12-year-old Carly Swanson in the 200-meter freestyle.

Swanson, who turned on the afterjets in the last 25 meters, got her first 13-14 cut in a career-best time of 2:25.46. Her previous best was 2:37.95. Swanson had another big time drop in the 100-meter freestyle with a third place finish of 1:08.91. Her previous best was 1:12.73.

She also finished third in her 200-meter breaststroke debut in 3:33.20.

“I am really happy with my swim because I have been working since I turned 12 to get all my 13-14 cuts so I can just go into being 13 with cuts,” Swanson said. “It really helps my confidence. Now that I know that I am capable of getting this time I will try even harder to get my other ones.

“I was just swimming as hard as I could because I really wanted to get the JO time,” Swanson said. “I think that race was more mental for me. I didn’t want the other girl to beat me. I could see her every time I took a breath. This is one of my better swims.”

Swanson said when she moved into Coach Rose’s group she stepped up her training.

“I started training harder coming into this season and I was getting faster times in intervals,” Swanson said. “That’s the difference.

In the cloud-covered morning 12-and-under session, SOFLO had 16 individual winners and two relay champions.

In addition to Martin’s three victories and Swanson’s impressive career-best swims, other individual winners were: Kayla Kelley, 10, 200-meter freestyle, 2:52.89; Ricardo Roche, 10, 2:33.39; Alfredo Mesa Jr., 11, 200-meter freestyle, 2:24.18; Kevin Porto, 10, 50-meter backstroke, 40.38; Jenna Shultz, 10, 100-meter breaststroke, 1:40.06; Diego Rodriguez, 12, 100-meter breaststroke 1:27.19 and 200-meter breaststroke, 3:11.53; Kelley Heron, 10, 100-meter freestyle, 1:12.88; Jorge Depassier, 10, 100-meter freestyle, 1:11.84 and 50-meter butterfly, 38.31; Alvena Walpole, 9, 50-meter butterfly, 38.55; and Jessica Rodriguez, 11, 200-meter breaststroke, 3:10.17.  

In the 13-and-over afternoon session, SOFLO had nine individual winners and dominated the 200-meter freestyle relays. In the girls’ 13-and-over, SOFLO had swept the top seven spots.

Individual champions were: Elle Weberg, 25, 100-meter breaststroke, 1:13.76; Dylan Sell, 13, 100-meter breaststroke, 1:21; Leo Andara, 23, 100-meter breaststroke, 1:07.80 and 200-meter butterfly, 2:10.43; Keegan Boisson-Yates, 14, 200-meter individual medley, 2:28.36; Tiffany Oliver, 17, 100-meter backstroke, 1:13.49; Maria Lopez, 14, 200-meter butterfly, 2:33; Blake Kelley, 14, 1500-meter freestyle and Tyler Sell, 17, 1500-meter freestyle, 17:15.71.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

http://www.csscswim.com

http://www.swim4comets.com

MOODIE FINISHES FIFTH AT ULTRASWIM; PHELPS KNOCKED OFF BY LOCAL SWIMMER

MOODIE FINISHES FIFTH AT ULTRASWIM; PHELPS KNOCKED OFF BY LOCAL SWIMMER


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

Hometown favorite Nick Thoman got the thrill of his life when he knocked off Olympic hero Michael Phelps and a star-studded field Saturday night at the Charlotte UltraSwim Grand Prix at the Mecklenburg Aquatic Center.

Thoman, 24, who has trained at the Mecklenburg Aquatic Center with Swim MAC Carolina and coach David Marsh for the last eight months, won the 100-meter backstroke in 53.70 seconds.
 
Phelps finished second in 53.92.

Olympian Matt Grevers was third in 54.50. World record holder and Olympic gold medalist Aaron Piersol was a distant fifth in 54.68.

“Winning here, winning with the home crowd, was really fun,” Thoman said.”Beating Phelps wasn’t the big picture, the big picture was getting a best time.”

Thoman is no unknown. He set the short course world record in the 100 backstroke on a leadoff relay leg last year.

“I was just trying to chip away at my best time,” Thoman said. “My goals are best times, suited or unsuited, and it’s another season-best so I am excited.”

Phelps had won the 100-meter butterfly on Friday. He scratched from the 50-meter freestyle after finishing ninth in Saturday morning’s prelims.

Phelps blamed his lack of conditioning for his poor showing on Saturday.

“I can’t really be disappointed,” Phelps said. “There’s some conditioning I need to fix, but hopefully by the end of the year I’ll be where I want to be.”

Phelps is now headed to Colorado Springs for a month of altitude training.
 
The South Florida Aquatic Club had a swimmer finish in the finals of the 50-meter freestyle.

2008 Jamaica Olympian Natasha Moodie, 19, a junior at Michigan and Miramar High alum, finished fifth in 26.00. She was the second fastest qualifier in morning prelims in 25.98, just off her career-best 25.76.

Moodie was the third youngest in the Top 8. Vanessa Garcia, 25, of Puerto Rico won the 50 in 25.38.Top qualifier Amanda Weir, 24, of Swim Atlanta was third in 25.59.

Other winners Saturday were Dagny Knutson in the women’s 200-meter butterfly, 2:10.97; China’s Peng Wu, men’s 200-meter butterfly, 1:56.92; Josh Schneider, men’s 50-yard freestyle, 22.38 edging Olympian Cullen Jones by 2/100ths of a second; Elizabeth Pelton, women’s 100-meter backstroke, meet record 1:00.64; Olympian Rebecca Soni in the women’s 200-meter breaststroke, meet record 2:22.21; Olympian Eric Shanteau in the men’s 200-meter breaststroke, 2:10.59; Olympian Chloe Sutton in the women’s 400-meter freestyle, 4:08.29;and Olympian Peter Vanderkaay in the men’s 400-meter freestyle, 3:48.94.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

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PHELPS WINS TWO GOLDS; THREE MEET RECORDS BROKEN ON DAY TWO OF CHARLOTTE ULTRASWIM

PHELPS WINS TWO GOLDS; THREE MEET RECORDS BROKEN ON DAY TWO OF CHARLOTTE ULTRASWIM


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

He qualified seventh in morning prelims, was off technically in the water and was hurting at the wall, but Michael Phelps still has the mental toughness that has made him the swimmer he is.

In an exciting race that had the packed crowd on its feet Friday night, Phelps edged Peter Vanderkaay by 0.04 seconds in the 200-meter freestyle on Day Two of the Charlotte UltraSwim Grand Prix at the Mecklenberg County Aquatic Center.

It looked like the Olympic champion was in trouble after finishing seventh in the 200 free prelims, one of his signature events.

Swimming in Lane One, Phelps went out fast and despite “a terrible” final 50, edged Vanderkaay, winner of the 1500 freestyle on Thursday, in 1:47.73. Vanderkaay was second in 1:47.77. Both times rank them 11th and 12th in the world.

Ryan Lochte of Daytona Beach was third in 1:49.05.

“There was not much left in the tank there at the end,” Phelps said. “That one took just about everything out of me. Under the circumstances, that wasn’t terrible, but I’d definitely like to be faster. There are some technical things I need to fix.”

Phelps came back to win the 100 butterfly, an event he holds the world record in, with a time of 52.41, the eighth fastest time in the world. Tyler McGill of Auburn was second in 53.15.

Phelps, who said his training hasn’t gone well lately, said following his remaining races, he will leave for Colorado Springs for an altitude training trip.

“Hopefully, I can make up some ground there and get some good training in,” Phelps said.

Still, Phelps was the only swimmer to win two events.

Phelps was also happy that the high-tech swim suits are now banned.

“If somebody wants it that bad, they can do it,” Phelps said.

Men will now wear jammers, suits that only stretch from the waist to knee.

“I think swimming can actually be called swimming again,” Phelps said. “It’s not about wearing what suit, who has this material, who has that material. I think we all have to follow the same guidelines and I think it’s really going to be a difference of who is going to work harder.”

Even without the high-tech suits, three meet records fell with outstanding swims by Rebecca Soni, Dagny Knutson and Elizabeth Beisel.

Soni’s meet record came in the women’s 100-meter breaststroke in 1:05.90.

In the women’s 200-meter freestyle, Knutson broke the meet record by edging out Chloe Sutton to win in 1:57.83.

Beisel won the women’s 400-meter individual medley in a meet record 4:39.32.

Olympian Natalie Coughlin won her first event of the meet in the women’s 100-meter butterfly in 58.46.

“My turn was awful,” Coughlin said. “The wall was a little funky, but this gives me something to work toward in the next few months. It’s easy for me to get excited at the start and go too fast.

“There are so many kids here,” said the 27-year-old Coughlin. “This is awesome. I remember being at the Santa Clara meet when I was 12 watching Summer Sanders. I was so excited and it was cool today to be on the other end of that.”

In other races, Austria’s Hunor Mate touched out Eric Shanteau to win the men’s 100-meter breaststroke in 1:01.66. Todd Patrick won the men’s 400-meter individual medley in 4:22.96.

The meet is being broadcast live throughout the weekend on www.swimnetwork.com and Universal Sports at 6 p.m.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

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AFTER LONG LAYOFF, ELLE WEBERG RETURNS TO SWIMMING, SIGHTS SET ON 2012 OLYMPIC RUN

AFTER LONG LAYOFF, ELLE WEBERG RETURNS TO SWIMMING, SIGHTS SET ON 2012 OLYMPIC RUN


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

PEMBROKE PINES—Elle Weberg was happy to be back in the pool racing again.

In her first race since the June 29-July 6 2008 U.S. Olympic trials in Omaha, Neb., the 6-foot tall breaststroker competing for the South Florida Aquatic Club won two events Saturday at the Florida Gold Coast Open Invitational at the Academic Village Pool.

Weberg, 25, won the 200-meter breaststroke in 2 minutes, 37.68 seconds and 50-meter breaststroke in 33.86. She also competed on one of SOFLO’s eight 200-meter medley relay teams.

For Weberg, it was the first step toward restoking her competitive fires for another run at the Olympics.

“I never lost my love for swimming, I am so fired up now,” Weberg said. “Swimming is now my main concern in life and it’s never been my main concern so this is really a cool feeling. I feel like I can really appreciate it now that I am 25. It took me this long.”

Weberg graduated from Florida Atlantic University in 2008. She was a member of the swim team and competed through 2007. She was the Outstanding Female Athlete of the Year in 2006 and 2007 and four-time All-American.

She competed at the 2007 World University Games where she finished second in the 400-meter medley relay, fifth in the 50-meter breaststroke and sixth in both the 100 and 200 breaststroke events.

The U.S. national team member, ranked as high as 22 in the world in the 200 breaststroke, took time off after college to figure out how she could continue swimming and support herself while training.

The Bloomington, Minn.-born soccer player-turned-swimmer has been swimming since she was 9. She never lost her passion for the sport. She just needed time to organize her life.

“It was really about finances,” Weberg said. “I had to figure out how I could devote myself to swimming and it could be my full-time job without having another full-time job and just making it work.”

After some trials and tribulations, Weberg said she has figured it out and has found her way back to the pool.

She has been somewhat of a gypsy, living in five different locations in the last four months including a friend’s couch. She found a job at the Sailfish Club in Palm Beach, where she started a small team and gives private swim lessons and plans to move to Coral Springs next month.

“They are very flexible with my schedule so yes I think I have finally made it work,” Weberg said.

With collegiate swimming and studies behind her, Weberg can focus solely on training full-time.

“Definitely, definitely, definitely I am happy now,” Weberg said. “I was really not happy. I feel like I have never been part of a team that has athletes that can push me. Being on SOFLO now with eight-plus Olympians is huge.

“Vlad Polyakov is the most inspiring person I feel like I have ever been around. It’s really great training with him. Every day he is so intense and so professional. It’s awesome to be around him.”

Polyakov, a two-time Olympian, also won the 200-meter breaststroke by more than a half pool’s length in 2:18.59 and 50-meter breaststroke in 29.47.

SOFLO coach Michael Lohberg has already picked apart and honed Weberg’s stroke.

“Michael has really pulled apart my stroke and a lot of what I am doing,” Weberg said. “I started there the end of January and it was really spotty in the beginning. For a month and a half I felt like crap and now I am putting everything together.

“It’s just starting to come together and I am just starting to feel good. I am getting back into shape. I could have taken it out a little faster but it’s my first swim back.”

Weberg feels she has only scratched the surface at the elite level. She took bronze medals in the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke at the 2007 Short Course National Championships.

“I didn’t even know what a national team was until I made it,” she said. “I trained alone leading up to trials and I wasn’t happy about trials because I swam the same time that I did the year before. I know I am a much faster swimmer. I have a lot of untapped potential. I am so excited about the future.”

Weberg’s wins were among 32 first place finishes for the newly-formed SOFLO team, also excited about the future.

SOFLO had 13 individual and relay winners in the 12-and-under morning session and 19 in the afternoon 13-and-over session.

Individual winners in the morning session were: Jessica Rodriguez, 11; Federico Maeso, 10; Tyla Martin, 12 (three wins); Diego Rodriguez, 12; Kelley Heron, 10 (two wins); Alvena Walpole, 9; Jorge Depassier, 10; and Andres Menchaca, 12. SOFLO also won both 12-and-under 200-meter medley relays.

In addition to Weberg and Polyakov, the afternoon session individual champions were: Maria Lopez, 14 (two wins); Kayla Moodie, 13; Dylan Sell, 13; Lindsey McKnight, 16 (two wins); Leo Andara, 23; Bogdan Cioanta, 14; Amber Hunter, 14; Stefan Lackner, 24; Arlene Semeco, 26; Keegan Boisson-Yates, 14; and Leonie Davies, 13. SOFLO won both 13-and-over 200-meter medley relays.

The three-day meet concludes Sunday with two sessions. The 12-and-under swimmers begin competition at 8:30 a.m. and 13-and-over swimmers begin at 1 p.m.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

http://www.swim4comets.com

http://www.csscswim.com