Alia Atkinson Named FINA Athletes’ Committee Chair; Dylan Carter Selected For Committee


By Sharon Robb
BUDAPEST, Hungary, June 30, 2022—Five-time Jamaican Olympian Alia Atkinson was elected the first-ever chair of FINA’s Athletes’ Committee at the 19th FINA World Aquatics Championships.

The former longtime South Florida Aquatic Club swimmer was among 20 athletes elected by their peers from their aquatic sport with six athletes later appointed and six others named honorary members by FINA, the international swimming federation. The sports represented are synchronized swimming, diving, high diving, open water swimming, swimming and water polo.

Atkinson, a four-time gold medalist at the World Swimming Championships (25-meters), will serve a four-year term. Voting took place by electronic ballots throughout the championships. Atkinson, 33, and six others ran unopposed.

“Today marks another significant step forward for both FINA and all aquatics athletes,” Atkinson said. “The Athletes’ Committee will act as a critical link between athletes and FINA.

“Having the athlete community choose those who represent them in important decisions is critical for the future development of our beloved sport.”

Atkinson’s final competitive meet was the 2021 15th FINA Short Course World Championships in Abu Dhabi.

British diver Jack Laugher, a three-time Olympic medalist, was named vice-chair of the committee.

The elected contingent includes nine other swimmers: former Plantation American Heritage swimmer Dylan Carter of Trinidad & Tobago; Therese Alshammar of Sweden, Ireland’s Shane Ryan, Hong Kong’s Siobhán Haughey, Dmitriy Balandin of Kazakhstan, Australia’s Jessica Hansen, Papua New Guinea’s Ryan Pini, Uganda’s Jamila Nsibambi Lunkuse and Matthew Sates of South Africa.

The second diving representative elected was Maria Polyakova of Russia, a former European champion in the women’s 1-meter springboard.

Synchronized swimming is represented by Egypt’s Nehal Saafan and Bill May of the U.S. Brazil’s Ana Marcela Cunha, who used to train in Davie, and the Netherlands’ Ferry Weertman will represent open water swimming.

Anna Bader of Germany and Alain Kohl of Luxembourg were elected to represent high diving, along with water polo players Margarita Plevritou of Greece and Felipe Perrone Rocha of Spain.

“Athletes are the heartbeat of aquatics,” said FINA President Husain Al-Musallam. “There is no sport without athletes. This is why I am so proud to be part of these historic elections.

“With equal gender representation and athletes from all six continents across all disciplines, I have no doubt that those elected will strengthen and promote the athletes’ voice for the benefit of the entire aquatics community.”

Britain’s three-time Olympic and eight-time World Championship swimming gold medalist Adam Peaty was among the six current athletes appointed by Al-Musallam to join the Athletes’ Committee. Hungary’s Dániel Gyurta and Italy’s Federica Pellegrini are also set to serve on the panel as elected members of the International Olympic Committee’s Athletes’ Commission.

The Athletes’ Committee is responsible for offering input into the organization of the World Championships and the development of technical rules, and is designed to serve as the “athletes’ voice in aquatics sport”.

This is Musallam’s first World Championships as President, which was marked by FINA’s decision to require transgender athletes to have completed transition by the age of 12 to be eligible for women’s events.

OPEN WATER SWIMMING: Florida’s Anna Auld Seventh In 25K

Brazilian Ana Cunha, who once trained in Davie, won a close race in the women’s 25K at the 19th FINA World Championships in 5:24:15.0. She was followed by Lea Boy of Germany, 5:24:15.2 and Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Netherlands, 5:24:15.3. University of Florida’s Anna Auld of West Palm Beach, representing the U.S., was seventh in 5:26:25 among a field of 15 swimmers.

Italy’s Dario Verani won the men’s 25K title in 5:02:21 followed by Axel Raymond of France, 5:02:22 and Hungary’s Peter Galicz, 5:02:35. Azura’s Maximiliano Paccot of Uruguay was unable to finish after swimming for 1:34:08 among a field of 25 swimmers.

In the men’s 10K, Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy’s won in 1:50:56 followed by teammate Domencio Acerenza, 1:50:58 and Germany’s Florian Wellbrock, 1:51:11. Azura’s Jahir Lopez of Ecuador was 46th in 2:03:23 and Maximiliano Paccot of Uruguay was 48th in 2:05:01.

In the women’s 10K, Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Netherlands won in 2:02:29.2 followed by Leonie Beck of Germany, 2:02:29.7 and Cunha, 2:02:30. American Katie Grimes was fifth in 2:02:37.

In the men’s 5K, Germany’s Florian Wellbrock won in 52:48 followed by Italy’s Gregorio Paltrinieri, 52:52 and Mykhailo Romanchuk of Ukraine, 53:13. Azura’s Maximiliano Paccot of Uruguay was 41st in 59:43.

In the women’s 5K, Cunha also won in 57:52 followed by Aurelie Muller of France in 57:53 and Italy’s Giulia Gabbreilleschi in 57:54. University of Florida’s Anna Auld of West Palm Beach was 20th in 1:00:57. Azura’s Fatima Portillo, 19, of El Salvador was 37th in 1:04:56.

In the opening event, the 6K mixed relay, Germany (1:04:40), Hungary (1:04:43.0) and Italy (1:04:43.0) were the top three finishers. The U.S. finished seventh in 1:05:50. Twenty-three nations competed.

CARIBBEAN GAMES
The historic inaugural Caribbean Games are underway in Guadeloupe. More than 800 athletes from 29 countries began competing on Thursday. Seven sports over five days are being held. The event is being televised on Panam Sports Channel.

Panam Sports President Neven Ilic watched with sport leaders throughout the continent and wished the athletes nothing but success during the Games.

“It’s nice to see the joy of the athletes parading. They are the future of our sport and our work must focus largely on them, on the new generations. We started with the Cali 2021 Junior Pan American Games, then came the Rosario 2022 Youth South American Games and now the Caribbean has its own celebration of U-23 sport. I congratulate CANOC and Guadalupe for this fantastic and historic party and wish much success to the enthusiastic athletes.”

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Alia Atkinson Ends Illustrious Career; Dylan Carter Takes Silver At FINA Short Course World Championships


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 20, 2021–South Florida Aquatic Club’s Alia Atkinson took her final bow on the world stage Monday at the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Etihad Arena.

The five-time Jamaican Olympian, after being disqualified earlier in the week in the 50-meter breaststroke semifinals, bounced back to finish fourth in the 100-meter breaststroke in 1:04.03, her signature event and one she shares the world record (1:02.36) with Lithuanian Ruta Meilutyte.

In her last hurrah, Atkinson, 33, finished behind China’s Qianting Tang (1:03.47, Asian record), Sweden’s Sophie Hansson (1:03.50) and Ireland’s Mona McSharry (1:03.92) in her final competitive meet. She had won the 100 breaststroke in 2014, 2016 and 2018.

“Not the meet I hoped for but I am happy to say I finished every ounce of swimming talent God gave me, the bottle empty. Many times I wanted to quit or give up, but I saw it through to the end,” Atkinson wrote in a post to social media.

Atkinson said her long run career was “remarkable” and “a rollercoaster of fun and not so fun moments”.

Her advice to up-and-coming swimmers:

  • Make fun memories…they don’t make themselves.
  • Take nothing for granted and enjoy each step both the good and the challenging.
  • Let go of the negatives of the day.
  • Your best changes daily, so do the best you can on that day.

SOFLO teammate Julio Horrego, representing Honduras, was 26th in the 50-meter breaststroke in 27.38 in his final event of the meet.

Trinidad and Tobago’s Dylan Carter, a Plantation American Heritage alum, took silver in the 50-meter butterfly in 21.98, just behind Brazil’s 41-year-old world record holder Nicholas Santos in 21.93. Santos became the oldest swimmer to win a world title. Carter swam the third fastest time in the semifinals in a national time 22.18.

In championship final action:

To kick off the finals, the U.S. and Russian Swimming Federation tied for gold in the 4×50-meter medley relay in 1:30.51. The U.S. relay of Shaine Casas, Nic Fink, Tom Shields and Ryan Held also broke the American short course record.

Canadian Sydney Pickrem won the 200-meter individual medley in 2:04.29.

Canada also won the 4×200-meter freestyle relay won in 7:32.96 with relay swimmers Summer McIntosh, Kayla Sanchez, Katherine Savard and Rebecca Smith, ahead of the U.S. in 7:36.53.

Canada won another gold medal in the 50-meter backstroke when Maggie MacNeil broke the world record of 25.60 in 25.27.

Japan world record holder Daiya Seto led from start to finish to win the 400-meter individual medley in 3:56.26. Runner-up Illia Borodin of the Russian Swimming Federation broke the junior world record in 3:56.47.

The five-day meet concludes Tuesday.

FINA is offering a prize money pool of $2.8 million, a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There is also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

There are 943 swimmers from 183 countries competing. The swimming is part of the Aquatics Festival which includes open water swimming, high diving and diving team competition.

Final sessions of the pool swimming will be streamed on NBC Sports’ Olympic Channel. Eurovision Sport’s All Aquatics will air the heats.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Atkinson, Horrego Race Monday; U.S. Men Break American Relay Record At FINA Short Course World Championships


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 19, 2021–South Florida Aquatic Club’s Alia Atkinson redeemed herself and will have one last shot at a medal in her final career 100-meter breaststroke race on Monday.

The five-time Jamaican Olympian, after being disqualified earlier in the week in the 50-meter breaststroke semifinals, earned the fourth fastest seed in the semifinals Sunday at the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Etihad Arena.

Atkinson, 33, qualified fourth in 1:04.26 behind China’s Qianting Tang (1:03.99), Sweden’s Sophie Hansson (1:04.17) and Ireland’s Mona McSharry (1:04.22).

SOFLO teammate Julio Horrego, representing Honduras, will also swim on Monday in the 50-meter breaststroke prelims.

Trinidad and Tobago’s Dylan Carter, a Plantation American Heritage alum, swam the third fastest time in the semifinals of the 50-meter butterfly in a national time 22.18 and is in medal contention going into the final.

In championship final action:

The U.S. men’s 4×200-meter freestyle relay broke the American record to win gold in 6:47.00 with relay members Kieran Smith, Trenton Julian, Carson Foster and Ryan Held. Julian had the fastest split of 1:41.35. The previous record was 6:49.58 set in 2010.

Ranomi Kromowidjojo of the Netherlands won the 50-meter butterfly in a meet record 24.44, second fastest women’s 50 butterfly of all-time. American 17-year-old Claire Curzan broke the world junior record in 24.55 and took the bronze.

Kliment Kolesnikov of the Russian Swimming Federation won his first gold medal of the meet, winning the 100-meter individual medley in 51.09. Less than a hour later, he won the 50-meter backstroke in 22.66. Christian Diener of Germany and Lorenzo More of Italy tied for the silver in 22.90.

Israeli teenager Anastasia Gorbenko continued her outstanding meet winning her second gold medal in the 100-meter individual medley in a best time 57.80. She overtook the lead on the breaststroke and led for the remainder of the race.

China’s Li Bingjie won her second gold of the meet in the 400-meter freestyle in 3:55.83, a day after winning the 800 freestyle.

Great Britain’s Ben Proud won the 50-meter freestyle in 20.45, just 0.05 shy of his national record.

In a hotly-contested race, Italy won the 4×50-meter men’s freestyle relay in 1:23.61, just ahead of the Russian Swimming Federation in 1:23.75 and the Netherlands in 1:23.78.

The five-day meet continues Monday with the pool competition and ends Tuesday.

FINA is offering a prize money pool of $2.8 million, a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There is also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

There are 943 swimmers from 183 countries competing. The swimming is part of the Aquatics Festival which includes open water swimming, high diving and diving team competition.

Final sessions of the pool swimming will be streamed on NBC Sports’ Olympic Channel. Eurovision Sport’s All Aquatics will air the heats.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Americans Fink, White Win Gold; SOFLO’s Atkinson Swims Final Event At FINA Short Course World Championships


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 18, 2021–The U.S. team rebounded with two gold medals Saturday at the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Etihad Arena.

Nic Fink, in fourth place with a lap to go, rallied to win the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:02.28 to win his first gold medal of the meet and second overall. He took bronze in the 100 breaststroke. He was just 0.08 seconds off his American record he set while competing in the International Swimming League.

U.S. teammate Rhyan White won the 200-meter backstroke in 2:01.58. White and Canadian Kylie Masse took turns in the lead before White came on with a 30.86 split on the last lap.

South Florida Aquatic Club’s Alia Atkinson, 33, will go after her final chance at a medal in her final career meet when she competes in the 100-meter breaststroke heats. The five-time Jamaican Olympian was disqualified in the 50-meter breaststroke semifinals. SOFLO teammate Julio Horrego, representing Honduras, has the 50-meter breaststroke on Monday.

In championship final action:

Hong Kong’s Siobahn Haughey won her second gold medal of the meet, winning the 100-meter freestyle in a meet record 50.98. She also won the 200 freestyle earlier in the meet in world record time.

Italy’s Matteo Rivolta won the 100-meter butterfly in 48.87 ahead of South African Chad le Closs in 49.04.

With American Katie Grimes out of the race because of COVID-19 protocols, China’s Li Bingjie won the 800-meter freestyle in a meet record 8:02.90.

The Netherlands won the mixed medley 4×50-meter relay in a meet record 1:36.20 ahead of the U.S., second in 1:37.04, with relay members Kira Toussaint, Arno Kamminga, Thom de Boer and Ranomi Kromowidjojo.

Also on Saturday, Olympic teammates Lydia Jacoby and Katie Grimes withdrew from the meet due to COVID-19 protocols.

Jacoby, the Alaskan who won the 100-meter breaststroke in Tokyo, was the only individual U.S. Olympic gold medalist entered in short course worlds. Grimes, the youngest athlete on the U.S. Olympic team at age 15, was fourth in the 800-meter freestyle in Tokyo.

The five-day meet continues Sunday with the pool competition and ends Tuesday.

FINA is offering a prize money pool of $2.8 million, a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There is also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

There are 943 swimmers from 183 countries competing. The swimming is part of the Aquatics Festival which includes open water swimming, high diving and diving team competition.

Final sessions of the pool swimming will be streamed on NBC Sports’ Olympic Channel. Eurovision Sport’s All Aquatics will air the heats.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Siobhan Haughey Breaks World Record; SOFLO’s Atkinson Disqualified In Semis At FINA Short Course World Championships


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 16, 2021–In a wild start to the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Etihad Arena, a world record was broken, a relay finish tied for gold and several swimmers were disqualified including world record holder Alia Atkinson.

South Florida Aquatic Club’s five-time Jamaican Olympian was disqualified in the 50-meter breaststroke semifinals. Atkinson, 33, the top seed and defending champion in the event, was disqualified for a downward dolphin kick before her first place finish in 29.55. Atkinson had won gold in the event in 2018 in China and still holds the world record of 28.56.

In an unprecedented call, thirteen other swimmers were disqualified in the women’s 50 breaststroke and men’s 100 breaststroke prelims. According to meet officials, all disqualifications were called by underwater cameras and not one specific lane judge.

Atkinson has the 100-meter breaststroke left to swim on Sunday with opening heats.

SOFLO teammate Julio Horrego, 23, representing Honduras, was 25th overall in the 100-meter breaststroke heats in 58.80 and fell short of making the semifinal round.

In championship final action:

Siobhan Haughey of Hong Kong took down the world record and course record in the 200-meter freestyle in 1:50.31. Her opening split was 53.81. She earned $50,000 in world record bonus money in addition to $10,000 for first place. The previous record was 1:50.43, set by Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom in 2017.

Felix Auboeck of Austria won the 400-meter freestyle in a national record 3:35.90. It was his first gold medal in the event.

Italy’s Alberto Razzetti won the 200-meter butterfly in 1:49.06 ahead of Switzerland’s Noe Ponti in 1:49.81 and Olympic gold medalist Chad le Clos of South Africa in 1:49.84.

Canadian Tess Cieplucha won the 400-meter individual medley in 4:25.55. It was her first world title in the event. American Melanie Margalis of St. Petersburg took the bronze in 4:26.63.

In an exciting race, Daiya Seto of Japan won the 200-meter individual medley in 1:51.15 followed by American Carson Foster in 1:51.35 and Italian Alberto Razzetti in 1:51.54.

In another exciting race, the U.S. and Canada tied for gold in the women’s 4×100-meter freestyle rely in 3:28.52. Sweden took bronze in 3:28.80. The Canadian foursome of Kayla Sanchez, Margaret MacNeil, Rebecca Smith and Katherine Savard broke the national record. The U.S. relay members were Kate Douglass, Claire Curzan, Katherine Berkoff and Abbey Weitzeil.

Russia (Kliment Kolesnikov, Andrei Minakov, Vladislav Grinev and Aleksandr Shchegolev) won the men’s 4×100-meter freestyle relay in 3:03.45. Italy was second in 3:03.61 and U.S. (Ryanb Held, Hunter Tapp, Shaine Casas, Zach Apple) was third in 3:05.42.

The five-day meet continues Friday with the pool competition and ends Tuesday, Dec. 21.

FINA is offering a prize money pool of $2.8 million, a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There is also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

There are 943 swimmers from 183 countries competing. The swimming is part of the Aquatics Festival which includes open water swimming, high diving and diving team competition.

Final sessions of the pool swimming will be streamed on NBC Sports’ Olympic Channel. Eurovision Sport’s All Aquatics will air the heats.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Italy Wins First Gold Medal At FINA Short Course World Championships; SOFLO’s Atkinson, Horrego Race Thursday


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 15, 2021–Italy won the inaugural open water mixed team relay Wednesday at the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Yas Bay.

It was the first time the new open water event was held at the championships.

Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy led his relay team in the 6K event. His split of 15:49.1 was the fastest of the nine teams that competed. He was 3.2 seconds faster than Hungary’s Kristof Rasovszky, who challenged him in the final lap.

“It was a tough race,” Paltrinieri said. “Since Tokyo, I have been focusing on pool training, mostly on the 1500 meters. Today was a race in the sea, but it was also a 1500-meter race so I decided to swim the relay.

“Relays are always fun. I won’t be swimming the 10K Thursday. I battled with Kristof for the last 200 meters and he was trying to stay close to me. After the last buoy I gave it everything I had and he wasn’t able to pass me.”

Hungary was second in 1:06.51 and Germany was third in 1:07.29. The Italian team will split $20,000 in prize money. Hungary earned $16,000 and Germany $12,000.

Martina De Memme led off the Italian relay in 17:23.8 and was the sixth fastest lead-off swimmer in the event. De Memme was also the oldest swimmer on the Italian relay at age 30. Giulia Gabrielleschi, 25, the youngest Italian swam the second leg in 17:24.60 and was fifth fastest swimmer in the second leg. Domenico Acerena swam the third leg in a time of 16:10.6, second-fastest third leg swimmer.

Longtime St. Andrew’s Aquatics director and coach Sid Cassidy of the FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee directed the open water event.

The five-day meet continues Thursday with the pool competition and ends Tuesday, Dec. 21.

SOFLO and Florida Gold Coast will be well-represented. SOFLO Olympians Alia Atkinson of Jamaica and Julio Horrego of Honduras will represent their countries. Both will compete Thursday. Atkinson, the world record holder in the 50-meter breaststroke, is seeded second in 28.88. Horrego will compete in the 100-meter breaststroke. His entry time is 1:01.18, seeded 37th.

Other FGC swimmers competing are:

Steven Aimable, Senegal, Azura.
Julimar Avila, Honduras, Azura.
Nicole Frank, Uruguay, Azura.
Yeziel Morales, Puerto Rico, Azura.
Maria Fe Munoz, Peru, Azura.
Kerry Ollivierre, Grenada, Azura.
Joaquin Vargas, Peru, Azura.
Sidrell Williams, Jamaica, Azura.
Dylan Carter, Trinidad and Tobago, American Heritage Plantation alum.
Izaak Bastian, Bahamas, Florida State, St. Andrew’s alum.
Miguel Cancel, Puerto Rico, University of Florida, Gulliver Prep alum.

FINA will offer a prize money pool of $2.8 million, a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There will also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

There are 943 swimmers from 183 countries competing. The swimming is part of the Aquatics Festival which includes open water swimming, high diving and diving team competition.

Final sessions of the pool swimming will be streamed on NBC Sports’ Olympic Channel. Eurovision Sport’s All Aquatics will air the heats.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Alia Atkinson Heads Large Florida Gold Coast Contingent At FINA Short Course World Championships; Big Prize Money On The Line


By Sharon Robb
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, December 13, 2021–World record holder Alia Atkinson is expected to take her final bow this week at the 15th FINA Short Course World Championships at Etihad Arena.

The five-day meet begins Thursday and ends Tuesday, Dec. 21. Etihad Arena is Yas Island’s new multi-purpose arena set on the stunning waterfront at Yas Bay.

Atkinson will be joined by SOFLO teammate and 2020 Olympian Julio Horrego, representing Honduras.

Atkinson, a five-time Jamaican Olympian who turned 33 on Dec. 11, is expected to retire from the sport at the end of the year. She recently completed her International Swimming League season with the London Roar, that finished third in the final playoffs.

Atkinson competed in her fifth Olympics in Tokyo where she finished third in her 100-meter breaststroke heat and failed to qualify for the semifinals. She did final in London in 2012 and Rio de Janeiro in 2016 where she finished fourth and eighth respectively.

She told the Jamaica Observer, “If you see me next year, then ask me what happened because that’s not the plan right now.”

Atkinson announced after Tokyo it was her final Olympic appearance.

“It’s funny, looking back the years went by so fast and before I realized it I was looking at the end of it,” Atkinson said. “I wouldn’t trade this journey for anything.”

Atkinson won the 100-meter breaststroke at the 2014 FINA Short Course World Championships in Doha, Qatar. She tied the World Record and gave Jamaica its first swimming gold medal at World Championships. She also took silver in the 50-meter breaststroke in Doha.

The following August, she became the first Jamaican swimmer to win a long course worlds medal when she took bronze in the 100-meter breaststroke and silver in the 50-meter breaststroke at the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazan.

Atkinson broke her own world record (28.64) in the 50-meter breaststroke (28.56) at the short course meters 2018 World Cup. Later that year she added two more World Championship gold medals in the 50- and 100-meter breaststrokes and bronze in the 100-meter individual medley.

FINA announced the prize money pool for the meet is more than $2.8 million, including a 50 percent increase in prize money for individual swimmers. There will also be a $50,000 bonus for any swimmer who breaks a world record.

The top eight individual payoffs for first through eighth place are $10,000, $8,000, $7,000, $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.

In addition to Atkinson and Horrego, the Florida Gold Coast will be well-represented.

Azura Florida Aquatics is sending eight swimmers. They are Steven Aimable, Senegal; Julimar Avila, Honduras; Nicole Frank, Uruguay; Yeziel Morales, Puerto Rico; Maria Fe Munoz, Peru; Kerry Ollivierre, Grenada; Joaquin Vargas, Peru; and Sidrell Williams, Jamaica.

American Heritage Plantation alum and two-time Olympian Dylan Carter will represent Trinidad and Tobago.

St. Andrew’s alum and Florida State swimmer Izaak Bastian will represent the Bahamas.

Gulliver Prep alum and University of Florida senior Miguel Cancel, who trains summers at SOFLO, will represent Puerto Rico.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Energy Standard Captures Second International Swimming League Title


By Sharon Robb
EINDHOVEN, Netherlands, December 4, 2021—Energy Standard knocked off defending champion Cali Condors to win its second International Swimming League title in three years Saturday at Pieter van den Hoogenband Zwemstadion.

Energy Standard, 19-point leaders after the opening day, clinched the title with 534 points. Cali Condors were runner-up with 522 followed by London Roar with 393.5 and LA Current with 305.5.

SOFLO five-time Jamaican Olympian Alia Atkinson of London Roar was second in the 100-meter breaststroke in 1:03.85. Cali Condors’ Lilly King won in 1:03.75. It was King’s 18th ISL win in her specialty event.

London teammate Dylan Carter, two-time Olympian for Trinidad & Tobago, was third in the 100-meter freestyle in 46.45. He split 23.89 on the back half. He was also third in the 50-meter butterfly in 22.36.

Sarah Sjostrom of Energy Standard was selected the ISL MVP for the second time in three years. She was also the championship finals MVP. The Swedish Olympian won $120,000 in MVP prize money ($100,000 for the season and $20,000 for the finals). She scored 61 points in the match and 511.5 points for the entire season.

Other winners were:
Siobhan Haughey of Energy Standard became the first woman to break 51 seconds in the 100-meter freestyle, winning in 50.79, an Asian and ISL record. Teammate Sarah Sjostrom was second in 51.26.

Kyle Chalmers of London Roar came from behind to win the men’s 100-meter freestyle in 45.73.

Hali Flickinger of Cali Condors won the 200-meter butterfly in 2:03.73. She also won the 400 individual medley in 4:29.92.

Teppei Morimoto of London Roar won the men’s 200-meter butterfly in 1:50.44 just ahead of Chad Le Clos of Energy Standard in 1:50.97.

Ingrid Wilm of LA Current won the 100-meter backstroke in 55.73.

Evgeny Rylov of Energy Standard won the 100-meter backstroke in 48.94.

Sarah Sjostrom of Energy Standard won the 100-meter individual medley in 57.46, fastest time of the season.

Caeleb Dressel of Cali Condors won the 100-meter individual medley in 50.74.

Cali Condors’ Nic Fink won the 100-meter breaststroke in 55.56 breaking his own American short course record by 6/10ths of a second.

Kelsi Dahlia of Cali Condors won the 50-meter butterfly in 24.86.

Ben Proud of Energy Standard won the 50-meter butterfly in 22.18 ahead of LA Current’s Tom Shields in 22.27.

Siobhan Haughey of Energy Standard won the 200-meter freestyle in 1:51.04.

Townley Haas of Cali Condors won the 200-meter freestyle in 1:42.18.

Energy Standard won the mixed 4×100-meter medley relay in an ISL record 3:30.94 with Evgeny Rylov, Ilya Shymanovich, Anastasiya Shkurdai and Sarah Sjostrom. It is an unofficial world record since FINA does not keep world records for short course mixed medley relays.

Duncan Scott of London Roar won the men’s 400 individual medley in 4:03.24.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Atkinson Wins; Energy Standard, Cali Condors Will Battle It Out For ISL Title


By Sharon Robb
EINDHOVEN, Netherlands, December 3, 2021—Going into the final day of the International Swimming League championship finals, it looks like defending champion Cali Condors and 2019 champion Energy Standard will battle it out for the title.

After opening day competition on Friday at Pieter van den Hoogenband Zwemstadion, Energy Standard leads with 271 points followed by the Cali Condors with 250, London Roar with 206 and LA Current with 171.

SOFLO’s five-time Jamaican Olympian Alia Atkinson of London Roar won the 50-meter breaststroke in 29.15 ahead of Lilly King in 29.44. It tied the fastest swim (by King) this season.

London teammate Dylan Carter, two-time Olympian for Trinidad & Tobago, was sixth in the 50-meter freestyle in 21.15.

Adam Peaty (pay issues) and Kira Toussaint (health issues) not competing hurt London’s chance of being in the hunt for the title.

A costly mistake caused the Cali Condors to get disqualified in the women’s 4×100-meter medley relay with the Energy Standard winning and picking up big points. The relay was disqualified after King had a one-hand touch during the third turn of her breaststroke leg.

The Cali Condors men’s 400-meter medley relay bounced back with a win in an American record of 3:19.64 with Coleman Stewart, Nic Fink, Caeleb Dressel and Justin Ress.

Other winners were:
Former UM swimmer Kelsi Dahlia of Cali Condors won the 100-meter butterfly breaking the short course world record in 54.59. The previous record was 54.61 set by Sarah Sjostrom in 2014.

Tom Shields of LA Current won the 100-meter butterfly in 49.03, finishing ahead of well-rested Caeleb Dressel of Cali Condors in 49.23 and Chad Le Clos of Energy Standard in 49.54.

Beata Nelson of Cali Condors won the 200-meter backstroke in 2:00.33.

Evgeny Rylov of Energy Standard won the 200-meter backstroke in 1:47.88 ahead of Ryan Murphy in 1:48.12.

Lilly King of Cali Condors won the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:17.06.

Nic Fink of Cali Condors won the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:02.41. He also won the 50-meter breaststroke in an American record 25.72.

Ben Proud of Energy Standard won the 50-meter freestyle in 20.40 ahead of Kyle Chalmers of the London Roar in 20.96. It was the fastest 50 freestyle in British history.

Sarah Sjostrom of Energy Standard won the 50-meter freestyle in 23.27.

Duncan Scott of London Roar won the 200-meter individual medley in a British record 1:51.53.

Sydney Pickrem of London Roar won the 200-meter individual medley in 2:05.79.

Ingrid Wilm of LA Current won the 50-meter backstroke in 26.24.

Ryan Murphy of LA Current won the 50-meter backstroke in 22.56.

Siobhan Haughey of Energy Standard won the 400-meter freestyle in 3:58.80.

Tom Dean of London Roar won the 400-meter freestyle in 3:40.67.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Alia Atkinson Wins, London Roar Advances Into ISL Final Four


By Sharon Robb
EINDHOVEN, Netherlands, November 26, 2021–South Florida Aquatic Club’s Alia Atkinson won her final individual event of the ISL’s Match 5 playoff Friday at Pieter van den Hoogenband Zwemstadion.

The five-time Jamaican Olympian won the 100-meter breaststroke easily in 1:04.38 as the London Roar clinched a berth in the Final Four.

London teammate and two-time Olympian Dylan Carter of Trinidad & Tobago was second in the 100-meter freestyle in 46.47 just 24/100ths behind teammate Kyle Chalmers. He was also third in the 50-meter butterfly in 22.27. Carter led early but Tom Shields and Ben Proud reeled him in for the final meters.

Carter and Atkinson were relay members of the third place 4×100-meter medley relay that finished in 3:17.17 with Vini Lanza and Freya Anderson.

With a second-place finish in Match 5, London Roar clinched one of the four spots in the ISL championship.

Energy Standard won the four-team match with 561.5 points followed by the Roar with 498.5, LA Current with 415.5 and DC Trident with 289.5, ending its season.

Energy Standard’s Ilya Shymanovich of Belarus won the Match MVP honors with two jackpot wins for 30 points in the men’s 50- and 100-meter breaststroke. For the second time in two weeks, he broke his world short course record in the 100 breaststroke in 55.28.

Match 6, featuring Cali Condors, Toronto Titans, Aqua Centurions and Iron is Saturday and Sunday and will determine the final two teams.

Caleb Dressel will sit out the playoff match to rest for the final. The defending champion Cali Condors are heavy favorites to make the Final Four.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com