SENIOR NATIONALS PREVIEW: Lochte, Phelps Renew Rivalry; Florida Gold Coast Well-Represented; SOFLO’s Marc Rojas Competes Before Heading To FSU

SENIOR NATIONALS PREVIEW:
Lochte, Phelps Renew Rivalry; Florida Gold Coast Well-Represented; SOFLO’s Marc Rojas Competes Before Heading To FSU


By Sharon Robb

August 5, 2014—Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps will renew their rivalry in the meet of all meets this week at the Phillips 66 National Championships.

The five-day meet begins Wednesday at William Woollett Jr. Aquatic Center in Irvine, Calif. with so much on the line in every race.

The star-studded meet will serve as the USA National Team selection for the 2014 Pan Pacific Championships, 2014 Jr. Pan Pacific Championships, 2015 World Championships, 2015 World University Games and 2015 Pan American Games.

For many swimmers it will be a crossroads meet. For others, it will begin a remarkable journey that may lead to the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics.

For Lochte, now training at Swim MAC, it will test his on-again, off-again ailing knee that he said Tuesday “was 100 percent ready” against some of the best in the world including Phelps.

“I’m glad Michael is back,” Lochte said. “It’s definitely good for the sport and it helps me out, too, just because we push each other. Probably his golf wasn’t going so well. Bottom line, I’m glad he’s back.

“Every time we go on the blocks, we never want to lose. We always want to win and whether it’s racing against him or anyone else in this world, we want to go up there and win. He’s one of the best in swimming and I always like a challenge.”

Phelps and his longtime coach Bob Bowman are eager to see his workouts translate into fast racing. It will be Phelps’ first nationals since he retired after the 2012 London Olympics.

Phelps, who has competed in four meets since coming out of retirement in April, is entered in the 100-meter freestyle, 100-meter butterfly, 100-meter backstroke and 200-meter individual medley.

“We really have no idea how I will do,” Phelps said. “This will be the first time to really swim this many events at this level. First time being shaved since the Olympics. The 100 fly feels the best. It’s what I’ve raced the most since I came back.”

Said Bowman, “I think we’ll see how it goes this week and maybe if there is anything after that, we’ll see how that goes and kind of go from there. We just talked about it yesterday. I think it’s a nice little milestone, and it goes really quickly. It was funny, I was talking with Gregg Troy yesterday and he said the days can be so long, but the weeks and months go by really quickly, and that’s true.”

With so much riding on the outcome of every race, swimmers have been motivated to train at a high level this year and to lose the attitude of nationals “being just another meet.”

Said Jessica Hardy, “It’s been very motivating training this year knowing that we have to qualify for the next two year’s National Teams this summer.”

Every race will be intense. And, any and all events that feature Phelps and Lochte against each other will have fans on their feet.

Bolles alum Ryan Murphy coming off his freshman season at Cal-Berkeley where he won NCAA titles in the 100- and 200-yard backstrokes, is one of the backstroke favorites.

In the women’s competition, Missy Franklin, also coming off her freshman year at University of Cal-Berkeley and 17-year-old Katie Ledecky head the field. They will compete against each other in only the 200-meter freestyle.

South Florida Aquatic Club’s Marc Rojas, 20, heads the Florida Gold Coast contingent. The Florida State-bound junior will compete in the 50-meter breaststroke on Friday and 100-meter breaststroke on Saturday.

The meet will use an underwater video review system to ensure the highest level of accuracy in officiating.

USA Swimming will be live streaming prelims and finals at usaswimming.org. Universal Sports will also televise finals and stream online.

FLORIDA GOLD COAST SWIMMERS TO WATCH

AquaKids Sharks: Austin Manganiello, Blake Manganiello, Clara Smiddy, Sam Smiddy.

Boca Raton Swim Team: Harper Bruens

Coral Springs Swim Club: Brandon Goldman, Alex Evdokimov

Hurricane Aquatics: Katie Hoff

Metro Aquatics: Isabella Paez, Carlos Omana

North Palm Beach: Connor Knight

Pine Crest: Casey Francis

St. Andrew’s Swimming: Megan Moroney, Logan Heck

South Florida Aquatic Club: Marc Rojas

Swim Fort Lauderdale: Emily Kopas, Luke Torres, Adam Bull, Ryan Rosenbaum, Lauren Driscoll, Lindsey McKnight

Westminster Academy: Greg Penny, Logan Lassley

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
gttp://www.swim4soflo.com

Ledecky Breaks 25-Year Old Record; Adrian, Lochte Swim World-Bests

Ledecky Breaks 25-Year Old Record; Adrian, Lochte Swim World-Bests


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

June 29, 2013

From rookies Simone Manuel and Maya Dirado to veterans Ryan Lochte and Natalie Coughlin, USA Swimming will be sending a mixed bag of fifty swimmers to next month’s FINA World Aquatic Championships in Barcelona, Spain.

On the fifth and final night of the Phillips 66 National Championships and World Trials at the Indianapolis Natatorium, the U.S. team was finalized with some unexpected surprises.

Highlighting the final night of action, 16-year-old Katie Ledecky, Ryan Lochte and Nathan Adrian swam world-bests in their events.

Bob Bowman will serve as head men’s coach and Dave Salo head women’s coach of the U.S. teams. The world championships are July 28-Aug. 4.

Missy Franklin, 18, of Colorado Stars won the high point award with 97 points followed by Katie Ledecky, 16, of Nation’s Capital with 77. Ryan Lochte, 28, of Daytona Beach Swimming won men’s high point with 92 points and Matt Grevers, 28, of Tucson Ford was second with 76.

Bluefish Swim Club edged California Aquatics, 223-213 for the women’s team title. California Aquatics won the men’s title with 259.50 points followed by Tucson Ford with 244. California Aquatics won the combined team title with 471.50 followed by Tucson Ford with 368.50.

Women’s 1500-meter freestyle:

Teenager and Olympic gold medalist Katie Ledecky crushed Janet Evans’ 15-16 national age group record (15:52.10) that has stood since 1988 to win in 15:47.15, the fastest time in the world this year and long course national record. Ledecky, 16, is the second fastest American in history and fourth fastest ever in the world in the event. Californian Chloe Sutton was second in 16:07.75. Clearwater’s Becca Mann was sixth in 16:24.83.

“I am really happy with my time, it was the swim I was looking forward to this whole week,” Ledecky said. “I wanted to end with a bang. I wanted to swim a controlled race. I wanted to see if I could put together a good swim.”

Women’s 200-meter individual medley:

2012 Olympic bronze 200 IM medalist Caitlin Leverenz made the world team on the final night after the top morning seed won in 2:10.13, the fourth fastest time in the world this year. Florida’s Elizabeth Beisel was second. Leverenz went out fast in the butterfly (27.83) and built a body-length lead through the backstroke and breaststroke. Beisel finished in 2:12.11. Both Missy Franklin and Liz Pelton scratched from the event.

“It put a lot of pressure on me when it came down to the final day to make worlds,” Leverenz said. “I didn’t have quite the meet I hoped to have. I knew this was my best event and it was on the last day. I had to be patient.”

Men’s 200-meter individual medley:

Ryan Lochte won his signature event with a dominating swim in 1:55.44, the fastest time in the world this year. Conor Dwyer was second in 1:57.74. Lochte was under world record pace in the butterfly (24.69), backstroke and breaststroke and built a body length lead. It was Lochte’s third win of the meet.

“I don’t worry about racing the clock, I was just racing the other guys, it was a good field,” Lochte said. “I am a racer. I just get up there and race. I am never satisfied. I know in all my races there is always something I can improve. In that race there’s a lot.”

Men’s 800-meter freestyle:

Michigan’s Connor Jaeger broke open a two-man race against Michael McBroom to break the U.S. Open and national long course records in 7:46.78, third best time in the world this year. McBroom was second in a lifetime-best 7:47.13. It was Jaeger’s third win of the meet. Jaeger scratched from the 200 to make room for his training partner Michael Klueh on the world roster.

“We like racing each other and I was lucky to have three of my teammates right next to me,” Jager said. “I was relaxed going out and feeling confident. Michael pushed the pace early so I knew we were going to have a good race. Thinking about swimming the 1500 twice can be a little intimidating but this is what we train for year-round.”

Women’s 50-meter freestyle:

Veteran Olympian Natalie Coughlin is re-inventing herself in the sprint and it’s paying off. She went out quickly and finished first in 24.97. Top morning qualifier Simone Manuel, 16, of First Colony Swim Team in Sugar Land, Texas was second in 25.01 and lowered the national 15-16 age group record twice in prelims (25.06) and finals. It was Manuel’s first individual event she qualified for worlds. She will also be a member of the 4×100 free relay.

“It’s tempting but I tried not to look around at the other swimmers,” Coughlin said. “I kept my head still and just got my hand to the wall. I have really been working on power in my stroke especially up front. In the 50, it helps a lot.”

Men’s 50-meter freestyle:

Nathan Adrian, looking much better than he did in the 100, went out fast to win in 21.47, the fastest time in the world this year and tied the national long course record. Top seed and Adrian’s training partner Anthony Ervin was second in 21.70.

“I think I had to get myself mentally prepared for this meet,” Adrian said. “It’s quite an adjustment after the Olympics to have another trials the next year. It’s pretty hard to get into.”

Bolles Ryan Murphy won the “C” final in 23.16 and Bolles teammate Santo Condorelli won the “B” final in 22.73.

Florida Gold Coast Results:

Women’s 200-meter individual medley: “A” Final, 5. Jana Mangimelli, Gulliver Swim Club, 2:12.75 best time dropping from 2:13.48; 8. 2:14.97, prelims.

Men’s 200-meter individual medley: “B” Final, 7. Carlos Omana, Metro Aquatics 2:03.86; 15. 2:03.56, best time prelims, dropping from 2:05.49; 32. Sam Smiddy, AK Sharks 2:07.66.

ELSEWHERE

Michael Phelps will celebrate his 28th birthday on Sunday with family and friends in Baltimore. Phelps followed the world trials results but said swimming is the farthest thing from his mind and he has no intentions of returning to the pool even though several swimmers including Ryan Lochte and TV announcer Rowdy Gaines speculated that he will.

“Man, people will believe anything that’s written, anything that’s on TV,” Phelps told his hometown paper. “There’s nothing in the works with me coming back to swimming. This is a part of my life I’m enjoying. I’ve never had freedom like this and I live on my own time. I play golf three or four times a week. I wake up whenever I want. I’m not thinking about changing that. I want to help grow the sport and there are other ways to do it. My life, the way it is now, is great.”…

The five-day meet in Indianapolis did not draw the crowds that last year’s U.S. Olympic swimming trials did. Many believe without Michael Phelps, U.S. swimming will be a poor draw. But with so many new stars on the horizon, that theory will not hold water.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Missy Franklin Breaks Her Own U.S. Open Record In Final Event At World Trials

Missy Franklin Breaks Her Own U.S. Open Record In Final Event At World Trials


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

June 27, 2013

Olympian Missy Franklin continued her domination of the women’s competition Friday on Day Four of the Phillips 66 National Championships/World Championship Trials in Indianapolis at Indiana University Natatorium.

Franklin, 18, of the Colorado Stars is one of the few Olympians that doesn’t seem to be suffering from the post-Olympic year syndrome.

Franklin won her fourth national title of the meet in the 100-meter backstroke in which she broke her own U.S. Open record in 58.67 while out-sprinting top morning qualifier and future Cal-Berkeley teammate Liz Pelton.

“Actually, I am surprised,” Franklin said. “I am really, really happy with my times here. I wasn’t sure what to expect.”

It was Franklin’s final event of the meet after scratching Saturday’s 200-meter individual medley. At worlds, Franklin will compete in the 100 and 200 freestyle, 100 and 200 backstroke and 400 and 800 free relays.

“The main goal is to be faster in four weeks than we were right now,” Franklin said. “I think that’s the goal for everyone. It will definitely be about the little technical things the next four weeks.”

In the championship finals:

Women 400-meter freestyle:

After winning the 800 freestyle earlier in the week, Katie Ledecky, the 16-year-old Olympic champion, swam a lifetime-best and broke the 15-16 age group record in 4:04.05. Chloe Sutton was second in 4:06.64.

“I really just figured out how to swim the 400 this morning,” Ledecky said. “It gave me confidence to swim tonight. I learned how to control up front so I could have something left in the end. I just tried to control my energy.”

Ledecky will be making her world championship debut.

Men 400-meter freestyle:

Connor Jaeger, 22, of University of Michigan overtook early lead Conor Dwyer to break open a three-man race down the stretch to win in 3:45.89. Matt McLean, 25, of University of Virginia Aquaticas was second in 3:46.14. Dwyer, already qualified in the 200 freestyle, was disqualified after the race for a false start.

“I saw someone on the other side of pool and knew I had to put my head down, keep my stroke together and race,” Jaeger said. “You just got to burn the legs coming home. It felt pretty bad coming home. In the 400, you have to go right away. You can’t ease into it like the 1500.”

Women 100-meter breaststroke:

In a two-woman race, Breeja Larson, 21, of Aggie Swim Club pulled away from world and American record holder Jessica Hardy, 26, of Trojan Swim Club in the final 20 meters to win in 1:06.16, third fastest time in the world this year. Hardy was second in 1:06.49.

“On the first 50 I had to stay in control and not go full out,” Larson said. “Jessica is really good. She was tough to keep up with.”

Men 100-meter breaststroke:

Two-time NCAA champion Kevin Cordes, 19, of Tucson Ford, known for his yards accomplishments in college swimming, was under American record pace at the midway mark with a 27.98 split and went on to win in 59.99, the only swimmer to break 1 minute.

“I have been trying to break a minute and decided to go for it tonight and just barely did it,” Cordes said. “Breaking a minute for the first time is pretty awesome. The last 50 meters were pretty hard. I tried to get my head up and get to the wall. I know I can swim meters. I am not just a yards swimmer.” Nic Fink, 19, of Athens Bulldogs was second in 1:00.24.

Women 100-meter backstroke:

American record holder Missy Franklin surged in the final 15 meters to overtake early lead Liz Pelton, who went out in 28.89 for the first half of the race. Franklin won in 58.67, both a U.S. Open and long course national record. Pelton was second in 59.27.

“I was telling myself just to go and get your hand on the wall,” Franklin said. “That last 15 meters is the hardest part. You have to push yourself harder and give it everything you have.”

Said Pelton, “We just feed off each other. When we race it’s more of an exciting race every time. I look over to her and know we are going to be next to each other and fighting under the flags.”

Men 100-meter backstroke:

David Plummer out-touched Olympic champion and early leader Matt Grevers to win in 53.10. What looked like a four-man race down the stretch ended in the final 10 meters when Plummer surged ahead. Grevers went out in 25.63 for the first 50, but Plummer reeled him in with the second fastest time in the world this year. Grevers hung on for second in 53.25 and qualified for his first individual event.

Jacksonville Bolles alum Ryan Murphy finished third in the 100-meter backstroke in a lifetime-best and re-broke his 17-18 national age group record in 53.38, but fell short of making the world team. Murphy now holds the four best junior times in the 100 backstroke.

“This hurt a lot more than the 50,” Plummer said. “I have been racing Matt a long time. You know if you’re not in front of him you are not going to win.”

Said Grevers: “I just wanted to join the party in Barcelona. I wanted to get first or second to try and defend my title there. This was a big relief.”

Olympian and American record holder Allison Schmitt withdrew from the 400 freestyle after failing to make the finals in the 100 and 200 freestyle earlier in the week ending any chance of competing at the world championships.

Swimmers have to finish in the top two in FINA-qualified times to earn an individual spot on the U.S. team for Barcelona.

The four highest finishers in the 100 and 200 freestyles will make the U.S. team for relay help and winner in each of the non-Olympic events qualify for the July 19-Aug. 4 World Championships.

Saturday, the final day of competition, the events are 200 IM, 50 freestyle, men’s 800 freestyle and women’s 1,500-meter freestyle.

Florida Gold Coast Friday Results

Women’s 100-meter breaststroke: “C” Final, 2. Emily Kopas, Unattached-Sharks Swim Club 1:10.11, best time dropping from 1:11.14; 23. 1:11.23, prelims.

World Trials On TV

NBC Sports Network and Universal Sports is televising seven hours of the June 25-29 USA Swimming Phillips 66 National Championships in Indianapolis, which are also serving as the World Championship trials for the U.S. team.

The remaining schedule is: Saturday, June 29, 1-2:30 p.m., NBC and 11 p.m.-midnight, NBC Sports Network.

USA Swimming will also offer a live webcast of the entire meet on its website, prelims at 9 a.m. and finals at 6 p.m.

ELSEWHERE

University of Florida freshman Jessica Thielmann of Newcastle, England qualified for the British national team during her country’s nationals in Sheffield, England. Thielmann finished second in the 1,500 meters in 16:19.92 to qualify for world championships.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

http://www.swim4soflo.com

Franklin, Lochte Sweep Monster Doubles At World Trials

Franklin, Lochte Sweep Monster Doubles At World Trials


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

June 26, 2013

The scenario couldn’t have been any more exciting or painful Wednesday night at the Phillips 66 National Championships/World Championship Trials in Indianapolis at Indiana University Natatorium.

Two monster swimmers, two monster doubles, four victories in the books. Olympians Missy Franklin and Ryan Lochte took turns pulling off tough doubles to highlight action on the second day of competition.

Franklin, 18, of Colorado Stars and Lochte, 28, of Daytona Beach Swimming each won the 200-meter freestyle and 200-meter backstroke events to add to their national title resumes.

“I don’t want to go through that pain again,” Lochte said. “As I get older, it doesn’t get any easier. But I like the challenge and I love to race. A lot of people didn’t think I would be here, but I am a racer.”

Lochte has scratched from Thursday’s 400 IM and 50 backstroke.

Franklin became the first female swimmer ever to go under 2:06 in the 200-meter backstroke (2:05.68) on U.S. soil.

“That hurt a lot,” Franklin said.

Florida Gold Coast swimmers also had a banner night with Clara Smiddy of AK Sharks qualifying for “A” finals in the 200-meter backstroke; University of Florida sophomore Carlos Omana of Metro Aquatics for the “B” final in the 200-meter backstroke; and Emily Kopas, 16, swimming unattached for Sharks Aquatics, in the “C” final in the 200-meter breaststroke. All three swam lifetime-bests against fast fields.

In the championship finals:

Women 200-meter freestyle:

In a race where the top three seeds were Olympic gold medalists, top seed Missy Franklin made it look so easy. She went out in 27.04, 3/10ths of a second under world record pace. By the 100 split (55.96) she had a full body length and cruised for the win in 1:55.56, the second fastest time in the world. The battle was more exciting for second. Teenager Katie Ledecky, 16, of Nation’s Capital, surged for second in 1:57.63 and Shannon Vreeland was third 1:58.13. “I have been focusing on this event a lot, more on the little things and it’s paid off,” Franklin said.

Men 200-meter freestyle:

Lochte is getting close to his old self and it’s beginning to show. He wanted to take the race out fast and did splitting 24.64 for the first 50 meters. He led by a half-body length after 100 at 51.65 and held on despite Conor Dwyer and Ricky Berens bearing down. Lochte worked his legs to hold off the field and win in 1:45.97, fifth fastest time in the world. Dwyer was second in 1:46.25, seventh fastest time in the world this year and Matt McLean was third. “That was a tough race,” Lochte said. “I knew if I went out fast I had a good shot so that’s what I did. I have two more weeks of training to get ready for worlds.” Lochte was one six Olympians in the 200 field.

Women 200-meter breaststroke:

Olympic gold medalist and American record holder Breeja Larson, 21, of Aggie Swim Club got a brief scare from Laura Sogar, 22, of Bluefish, who led after the 50 (32.54) and 100 (1:09.01), less than a second off world record pace. Larson made her move on the third 50 with a 36.52 split to take the lead at 1:46.22 and pulled away for the win in 2:23.44, third fastest time in the world this year. Micah Lawrence, 22, of SwimMAC was second in 2:24.69. Sogar was third in 2:24.86. “It feels pretty good to make the team,” Larson said. “I really tried to focus on the 200, work on pacing and cardio more. It definitely paid off. I just swam my own race. I have a tendency to get overexcited in the finals so I just put on my horse blinders and just swam my race.”

Men 200-meter breaststroke:

In the same pool where he dominated the NCAA Championships and broke the American short course record, Kevin Cordes, 19, of Tucson Ford, Cordes qualified with the third fastest time in the world in prelims (2:09.16) and came back to win in 2:08.34, the fastest time in the world this year. He went out fast in 28.91 and at the 100 was 1:01.22, under world record pace. The crowd was on its feet as he split 33.03 to remain on record pace (1:34.25) but just missed the world and American records. BJ Johnson, 26, of Palo Alto was second in 2:10.09. “I could hear the crowd, they brought me home,” Cordes said. “This race gave me more confidence going into Barcelona.”

Women 200-meter backstroke:

Franklin, the world record holder and Olympic champion in this event, had plenty left after her freestyle. She took the lead (29.74 split) and opened up a half-body length (1:01.15) with a 31.41 split. With Liz Pelton bearing down, Franklin held for the win in 2:05.68, a U.S. Open record and second fastest time in the world. “The doubles are really rough, I’m not going to lie,” Franklin said. “It hurt a lot, but it’s good for me. It is so much fun. I love doing doubles, they are so energizing. I love having one race and getting right back up and doing another one.” AK Sharks 17-year-old Clara Smiddy was eighth in the race in 2:12.27 after swimming a lifetime-best 2:11.53 in prelims.

Men 200-meter backstroke:

Lochte followed in Franklin’s footsteps with the same strategy, going out fast, building a lead and holding on for the win in 1:55.16, third-fastest time in the world. Tyler Clary, 24, of Club Wolverine, the Olympic champion and top morning seed, was second in 1:55.58. Bolles 17-year-old Ryan Murphy was third in 1:56.37, a lifetime-best. Murphy took it out fast for the lead at 26.98 but Lochte came right back with a 28.55 split to lead after 100. He extended his lead at the 150 and then held off Clary. “I just wanted to get out there, get a lead and hold on for dear life,” Lochte said. “The last 50 I knew they were going to be closing in. I like being up in front and going from there. That’s a pretty good time considering my workouts haven’t been there this year. The hardest thing this year was trying to get back into the training mode.”

Women 50-meter butterfly:

With less than a second between the top three morning seeds in the event’s national debut, the race was expected to be close and it was. Third-seed Christine Magnuson, 27, of Tucson Ford won in 26.08, second fastest time in the world, and Kendyl Stewart, 18, of North Coast Aquatics was second in 26.19. Claire Donahue, 24, of Western Kentucky, despite the quickest start, was third in 26.23. “This is awesome, I am so happy to punch my ticket to Barcelona,” Magnuson said. “I wanted to clean up my breakout from this morning. There is still room for improvement. It was just about setting up my stroke for the first two and building from there.”

Men 50-meter butterfly:

Eugene Godsoe, 25, of Stanford Swimming knocked off top seed and favorite Matt Grevers to win in 23.29 and make his first world team with the ninth fastest time in the world this year. Grevers was second in 23.50. Grevers was quicker off the block but Godsoe had great finishing speed in the last 20 meters. “I made my first national team in Indy in 2005, it’s been a long time for me,” Godsoe said. “I am really excited. It was just a matter of hitting everything right without losing my stroke. Tonight I was in control of myself.”

Swimmers have to finish in the top two in FINA-qualified times to earn an individual spot on the U.S. team for Barcelona.

The four highest finishers in the 100 and 200 freestyles will make the U.S. team for relay help and winner in each of the non-Olympic events will qualify.

The World Championships are July 19-Aug. 4.

Florida Gold Coast Wednesday Results

200-meter breaststroke: 2. “C” Final, Emily Kopas, Unattached/Shark Aquatics 2:32.58, best time, dropping from 2:33.80, 23. 2:35.77 in prelims.

200-meter backstroke: 8. “A” Final, Clara Smiddy, AK Sharks 2:12.27, 7. 2:11.53, best time in prelims dropping from 2:13.33.

200-meter backstroke: 4. “B” Final, Carlos Omana, Metro Aquatics 2:00.60 best time; 12. 2:01.25, best time, prelims, dropping from 2:04.01.

World Trials On TV

NBC Sports Network and Universal Sports is televising seven hours of the June 25-29 USA Swimming Phillips 66 National Championships in Indianapolis, which are also serving as the World Championship trials for the U.S. team.

The schedule is: Tuesday, June 25, 6-8 p.m., Universal; Wednesday, June 26, 6-8:30 p.m., Universal; Saturday, June 29, 1-2:30 p.m., NBC and 11 p.m.-midnight, NBC Sports Network.

USA Swimming will also offer a live webcast of the entire meet on its website, prelims at 9 a.m. and finals at 6 p.m.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Franklin Breaks Meet Record On Opening Night Of World Trials

Franklin Breaks Meet Record On Opening Night Of World Trials


WRITTEN BY SHARON ROBB

June 25, 2013

Missy Franklin got the party started Tuesday at the Phillips 66 National Championships/World Championship Trials in Indianapolis at the Indiana University Natatorium.

The bubbly 18-year-old won the 100-meter freestyle in a meet record and lifetime-best 53.43. She broke the previous record of 53.58 set by Amanda Weir in 2006.

Trailing after the opening 50 meters, Franklin reeled in the field on the back half to post the world’s second fastest time this year. Her splits were 26.08 and 27.35.

Twelve-time Olympic medalist Natalie Coughlin, 30, set a quick pace of 25.70 for the opening 50 meters but faltered to fifth.

Top morning qualifier Shannon Vreeland, 21, of Athens Bulldogs was second in 53.83. Sixteen-year-old Simone Manuel of First Colony Swimming was third.

“I knew it was going to be a super fast final tonight,” Franklin said. “I knew I had to get out there and bring it home with everything I had. I am so, so happy with that time. I saw that time and I was absolutely over the moon. I’m so excited.”

It was the first of six events Franklin will swim this week. She is also entered in the 50, 100 and 200 backstroke, 200 freestyle and 200 individual medley. Wednesday will be the test with both the 200 freestyle and 200 backstroke on her plate.

“I love doing all that stuff,” said Franklin who will be a freshman this fall at Cal-Berkeley. She plans on swimming for the Bears for two seasons before likely turning pro leading up to the 2016 Rio Games.

“It’s weird we are already having another Trials. I’m excited to see who will make the team. I think there will be a lot of fresh faces.”

Another familiar face, Olympic gold medalist Nathan Adrian won the 100-meter freestyle against a stacked field that featured seven Olympians 27 Olympic medalists.

Adrian didn’t seem too pleased with his winning time of 48.10 but happy he made the world team.

Anthony Ervin got out fast in 22.38 and finished third in 48.49. Jimmy Feigen of Texas Aquatics was second in 48.24. Ryan Lochte was fourth in 48.58.

Lochte is also swimming the 200 freestyle, 200 backstroke, 100 butterfly and 200 and 400 individual medley.

“Obviously, I would have loved to be under 48, that would have been nice,” Adrian said. “It’s all about execution. But it wasn’t there tonight. We’ll just go back, develop a new strategy, regroup and get ready for a good 50. Until Barcelona, times are irrelevant.”

Jacksonville Bolles swimmer Caeleb Dressel, 16, broke the 23-year-old 15-16 national age group record twice in the 100-meter freestyle. He went 49.63 in prelims and 49.50 in finals. The previous record was 50.24 set by Joey Hudepohl in 1990.

In other championship finals:

Women’s 200-meter butterfly: Camille Adams, 21, of Aggie Swim Club and top morning qualifier, moved into the lead with 50 meters left to win the 200-meter butterfly in 2:08.10. She was followed by Maya Dirado, 20, of Stanford Swimming, in 2:09.12 and Katie McLaughlin, 15, of Mission Viejo. Clearwater’s Becca Mann, 15, was fourth. Adams time was the seventh fastest time in the world this year. Cassidy Bayer, 13, the youngest swimmer at world trials, won the “C” final.

Men’s 200-meter butterfly: Tom Luchsinger, 22, swimming unattached for North Carolina Aquatic Club, won in 1:55.57, the fifth fastest time in the world. Tyler Clary, 24, of Club Wolverine, surged in the final 30 meters to overtake early leader Tom Shields and clinch the second spot in 1:56.58. “This is a very big surprise,” Luchsinger said. “To win is an incredible feeling. We have so many good 200 flyers in this country, I didn’t expect this.”

Women 800-meter freestyle: Teenager Katie Ledecky, 16, had no problem winning the distance event and qualifying for her first world team. The Olympic champion and American record-holder won in 8:22.41 ahead of Chloe Sutton, second in 8:23.24.

Men 1500-meter freestyle: Connor Jaeger pulled ahead of the men’s field after 200 meters and finished in 14:53.34 for the win. Michael McBroom was second in 14:59.12.

Six spots were filled on the U.S. roster and 20 spots including relay swimmers.

Swimmers have to finish in the top two in FINA-qualified times to earn an individual spot on the U.S. team for Barcelona.

The next four highest finishers in the 100 and 200 freestyles will make the U.S. team for relay help and the winner in each of the non-Olympic events will qualify.

The World Championships are July 19-Aug. 4.

Florida Gold Coast Tuesday Results

200-meter butterfly: 19. Isabella Paez, 17, Metro Aquatics, 2:13.81 and 24th, prelims, 2:15.19; 43. Tiffany Oliver, 20, Club Seminole, 57.30.

World Trials On TV

NBC Sports Network and Universal Sports is televising seven hours of the June 25-29 USA Swimming Phillips 66 National Championships in Indianapolis, which are also serving as the World Championship trials for the U.S. team.

The schedule is: Tuesday, June 25, 6-8 p.m., Universal; Wednesday, June 26, 6-8:30 p.m., Universal; Saturday, June 29, 1-2:30 p.m., NBC and 11 p.m.-midnight, NBC Sports Network.

USA Swimming will also offer a live webcast of the entire meet on its website, prelims at 9 a.m. and finals at 6 p.m.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com

http://www.swim4soflo.com