St. Thomas Aquinas Alum Vlad Polyakov Named Auburn Associate Head Swim Coach


By Sharon Robb
AUBURN, Ala., May 11, 2021–Three-time Olympian and former world champion Vlad Polyakov was hired as associate head swimming coach at Auburn University.

Polyakov, a St. Thomas Aquinas and Alabama alum, will join head coach Ryan Wochomurka’s staff this fall. He spent nine years at Louisville as an assistant coach and men’s recruiting coordinator.

Polyakov will coach with Wochomurka for the second time in his career. Wochomurka was associate head coach at Louisville when he was hired in 2012.

Polyakov, 37, grew up in South Florida competing at St. Thomas Aquinas where he was a state breaststroke champion and in the Florida Gold Coast for Coral Springs Swim Club, where he was mentored by six-time Olympic coach Michael Lohberg. He is married to another former FGC swimmer, Mhyria Miller, who competed for Florida Keys Swim Club and is a former All-American at Georgia. They have two sons.

“I am very excited to welcome Vlad, Mhyria, Liam and Maksim to the Auburn family,” Wochomurka said. “Vlad brings an unequalled positive energy to the pool deck and is one the most genuinely well-liked and respected individuals in the industry.

“He is one of the brightest and most innovative technical coaches I have ever had the pleasure to work with. He also brings a tenacious and studious approach to recruiting and is one of the very best at identifying talent domestically and internationally. Vlad’s experience as an elite level athlete on the SEC, NCAA, and international stage allows him a unique opportunity to guide our student-athletes in their own elite level pursuits.”

In Polyakov’s nine seasons at Louisville, the Cardinals earned eight top-10 team finishes at the NCAA Championships, five women and three men. The Cardinals had 12 individual titles and one relay title at the NCAA Championships in his tenure, and three swimmers combined for six selections as ACC Swimmer of the Year. The 2020-21 season saw Louisville’s men match their program-best finish with a fifth-place showing at NCAAs and won the ACC Championship for the first time.

“My family and I are very excited to become part of the Auburn family,” Polyakov said. “Auburn swimming and diving was an undisputed standard of excellence during my college years. Auburn athletes that I raced against were tough and fierce competitors, and Auburn coaches of that era are still considered some of the greatest coaches in the world of swimming today.

“Auburn’s legacy is undeniable. I am honored to have the opportunity to be associated with one of the richest traditions in swimming and diving history. I share Ryan’s vision for the program and look forward to empowering our Auburn athletes to perform at the highest level of their ability both academically and athletically.”

Polyakov has extensive international experience and a long list of accomplishments in college and pro swimming. The 2007 Alabama alum and Hall of Famer was a five-time SEC Champion, two-time NCAA Champion and two-time US National Champion. He competed professionally for five years.

Polyakov was named Academic All-SEC four times and was also a four-time Coaches Association Academic All-American. In 2005, 2006, and 2007 he was named to the ESPN Academic All-American At-Large Team. He was given an Individual Academic All-American Award by the CSCAA in 2005. Polyakov was given the “Most Valuable” Award for Most Dedicated Student-Athlete of the Year in 2005 and 2006. During the 2006 season Polyakov was named the SEC Swimming and Diving Scholar-Athlete of the Year and also received the Coaches Award from the Crimson Tide team.

He was a three-time Olympian having swam in the 2004 Olympic games in Athens, the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, and 2012 Olympics in London for his native Kazakhstan. In 2004, he was a finalist in the 100-meter breaststroke and 200-meter breaststroke. In other international competition, Polyakov was a 2004 FINA World Championship bronze medalist in the 100- and 200-meter breaststrokes and in 2006 was a FINA World Championship gold medalist in the 200-meter breaststroke.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SOFLO’s Kathleen Golding, Miguel Cancel Earn Second Team All-SEC Honors; Florida’s Anthony Nesty Three-peats Men’s Coach Of The Year


By Sharon Robb
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., April 14, 2021–South Florida Aquatic Club’s Kathleen Golding and Miguel Cancel of University of Florida earned second team All-Southeastern Conference Swimming honors.

The Southeastern Conference announced its annual men’s and women’s swimming and diving awards for the 2020-21 season.

Golding was also named to the All-Freshman team.

For the All-SEC Teams, the first team consists of the top finisher in each event at the SEC Championships, and second team consists of the second- and third-place finishers in each event.

The All-Freshman Teams consist of any redshirt or true freshman who finished either in the top eight or is the highest scoring freshman of each event at the SEC Championships, excluding relay events.

Shaine Casas of Texas A&M was selected as the Male Swimmer of the Year, and Jake Magahey of Georgia was voted the Male Freshman Swimmer of the Year.

Juan Celaya-Hernandez of LSU was named Male Diver, while Bryden Hattie of Tennessee was named the Male Freshman Diver of the Year.

Anthony Nesty of Florida was chosen as Men’s Swimming Coach of the Year for the third consecutive year, and Ted Hautau of Kentucky earned the Men’s Diving Coach of the Year award.

“I am humbled to receive the SEC Coach of the Year Award this year,” Nesty said. “It is special to be honored in this way by your peers in the conference who also work tirelessly to reach the pinnacles in the sport.

“I am extremely proud of our men and what they have been able to achieve this past year despite the countless obstacles they encountered. They are a special group of men and it is has been an absolute pleasure and honor to coach them.”

Nesty led the Gators to their ninth SEC title in a row and 42nd title overall. At the NCAA Championships the Gators took third with 367 points, making it their best finish since 2017.

Before Nesty, former UF coach Gregg Troy won the honor the previous six times to make this the ninth consecutive coach of year honors for the Gators.

Rhyan White of Alabama was named as the Female Swimmer of the Year, and Mona McSharry of Tennessee was chosen the Female Freshman Swimmer of the Year.

Charlye Campbell of Texas A&M was voted Female Diver of the Year, while Montserrat Guiterrez Lavenant of LSU was tabbed as Female Freshman Diver of the Year.

Lars Jorgensen of Kentucky was voted Women’s Swimming Coach of the Year, and Jay Lerew of Texas A&M was named Women’s Diving Coach of the Year.

ALL-SEC FIRST TEAM
MEN: Matt King, Alabama; Jonathan Berneburg, Alabama; Sam DiSette, Alabama; Colton Stogner, Alabama; Adam Cheney, Florida; Will Davis, Florida; Bobby Finke, Florida; Eric Friese, Florida; Dillon Hillis, Florida; Kieran Smith, Florida; Javi Acevedo, Georgia; Jake Magahey, Georgia; Camden Murphy, Georgia; Luca Urlando, Georgia; Juan Celaya-Hernandez, LSU; Lyubomir Epitropov, Tennessee; Bryden Hattie, Tennessee; Clayton Bobo, Texas A&M; Kaloyan Bratanov, Texas A&M; Shaine Casas, Texas A&M; Kurtis Mathews, Texas A&M; Mark Theall, Texas A&M.

Women: Kalia Antoniou, Alabama; Cora Dupre, Alabama; Flora Molnar, Alabama; Morgan Scott, Alabama; Rhyan White, Alabama; Kaila Wong, Alabama; Ashley McCool, Florida; Gabi Fa’Amausili, Georgia; Courtney Harnish, Georgia; Zoie Hartman, Georgia; Dakota Luther, Georgia; Maxine Parker, Georgia; Riley Gaines, Kentucky; Izzy Gati, Kentucky; Lauren Poole, Kentucky; Sophie Sorenson, Kentucky; Kaitlynn Wheeler, Kentucky; Savana Trueb, Missouri; Kristen Stege, Tennessee; Charlye Campbell, Texas A&M.

ALL-SEC SECOND TEAM
MEN: Derek Maas, Alabama; Matthew Menke, Alabama; Miguel Cancel, Florida; Clark Beach, Florida; Trey Freeman, Florida; Jack Dalmolin, Georgia; Dillon Downing, Georgia; Bradley Dunham, Georgia; Ian Grum, Georgia; Zach Hils, Georgia; Greg Reed, Georgia; Mingli Zhang, Kentucky; Brooks Curry, LSU; Jack Dahlgren, Missouri; Takuto Endo, Missouri; Kyle Leach, Missouri; Danny Kovac, Missouri; Carlo Lopez, Missouri; Ben Patton, Missouri; Grant Reed, Missouri; Freddie Rindshoej, Missouri; Michael Houlie, Tennessee; Jace Brown, Texas A&M; Tanner Olson, Texas A&M.

WOMEN: Tanesha Lucoe, Alabama; Kensey McMahon, Alabama; Diana Petkova, Alabama; Peyton Palsha, Arkansas; Brooke Schultz, Arkansas; Talia Bates, Florida; Kathleen Golding, Florida; Katelyn Mack, Florida; Nikki Miller, Florida; Vanessa Pearl, Florida; Jillian Barczyk, Georgia; Danielle Della Torre, Georgia; Callie Dickinson, Georgia; Bailey Bonnett, Kentucky; Caitlin Brooks, Kentucky; Gillian Davey, Kentucky; Kyndal Knight, Kentucky; Amy Feddersen, Missouri; Megan Keil, Missouri; Alex Moderski, Missouri; Meredith Rees, Missouri; Sarah Thompson, Missouri; Molly Winer, Missouri; Bailey Grinter, Tennessee; Kaitlin Harty, Tennessee; Mona McSharry, Tennessee; Tjasa Pintar, Tennessee; Trude Rothrock, Tennessee; Megan Sichterman, Tennessee; Natalie Ungaretti, Tennessee; Alexis Yager, Tennessee; Taylor Pike, Texas A&M; Chloe Stepanek, Texas A&M; Aimee Wilson, Texas A&M.

ALL-FRESHMAN TEAM
MEN: Matt King, Alabama; Eric Stelmar, Alabama; Amro Al-Wir, Florida; Adam Chaney, Florida; Jace Crawford, Florida; Leonardo Garcia, Florida; Tommy-Lee Camblong, Georgia; Jake Magahey, Georgia; Luca Urlando, Georgia; Sam Duncan, Kentucky; Zane Rosely, Kentucky; Mitchell Mason, LSU; Takuto Endo, Missouri; Freddie Rindshoej, Missouri; Bryden Hattie, Tennessee.

WOMEN: Gracie Felner, Alabama; Diana Petkova, Alabama; Maia Goldstein, Auburn; Kensley Merritt, Auburn; Hannah Ownbey, Auburn; Elise Bauer, Florida; Kathleen Golding, Florida; Cecilia Porter, Florida; Amanda Ray, Florida; Maxine Parker, Georgia; Torie Buerger, Kentucky; Montserrat Lavenant, LSU; Mona McSharry, Tennessee; Chloe Stepanek, Texas A&M.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

SWIMMING ROUNDUP: Michael Phelps Documentary Streaming On NBC Universal’s Peacock; Locals Bastian, Nava, Valls Earn All-ACC Academic Honors


By Sharon Robb
NEW YORK, April 14, 2021—To mark Wednesday’s 100-Day Tokyo Olympics Countdown, “Michael Phelps: Medals, Memories & More” is streaming exclusively for free on Peacock, NBC Universal’s new streaming service.

Fans can revisit some of Phelps’ most exciting races in Olympic history.

The three-episode documentary features Phelps talking about the most dramatic races and pivotal moments in a career that earned him 28 Olympic medals, including 23 golds.

Joining him are NBC Sports swimming commentators Dan Hicks and Rowdy Gaines.

Episode 1: “Greatness Begins,” revisits Phelps’ Olympic debut at age 15 in Sydney, Australia.

Episode 2: “Eight Golden Races,” focuses on his races at the 2008 Beijing Games.

Episode 3: “London to Lasting Legacy,” looks at Phelps’ last two Olympics, his personal struggles and his decision to retire.

“The opportunity to revisit each of my Olympic races with Rowdy Gaines and Dan Hicks was filled with a lot of laughs and emotions,” Phelps said in a press release.

“The sport of swimming has come a long way over the years, and I’m excited to share some memories and insights from my Olympic career as the world looks forward to the upcoming Tokyo Games this summer.”

You can watch it on Peacock, the streaming service that offers hundreds of movies, binge-worthy TV shows, sports, news, and culture for free at any time.

Another sports documentary still streaming is “In Deep with Ryan Lochte.” Both are worth watching whether you swim or not.

ACC ANNOUNCES ALL-ACC ACADEMIC TEAMS; BASTIAN, NAVA, VALLS NAMED

NCAA champions Paige Madden of Virginia and Nicolas Albiero of Louisville highlight the 2021 All-Atlantic Coast Conference Academic Swimming and Diving Teams as the Scholar-Athletes of the Year.

Madden was named the ACC Women’s Swimming and Diving Scholar-Athlete of the Year for the second season in a row. The Mobile, Ala. native majors in kinesiology with a minor in health and well being and has a 3.703 career GPA. She achieved a GPA of 4.0 in the Fall 2020 semester, is a three-time CSCAA Scholar All-American and was a 2020 CoSIDA Academic All-American.

The senior Cavalier led Virginia to the ACC’s first-ever NCAA Championship in swimming in diving, earning three individual national titles in the process. She is the 2021 ACC Women’s Swimmer of the Year, was the Most Valuable Swimmer at the 2021 ACC Championships and five-time All-American at the NCAA Championships.

Albiero was selected as the ACC Men’s Swimming & Diving Scholar-Athlete of the Year for the second consecutive season. The senior from Louisville, Ky. majors in Exercise Science and has a 3.96 career GPA. Albiero is a three-time CSCAA Scholar All-American and was a 2020 CoSIDA Academic All-American.

The reigning NCAA Champion in the 200 butterfly, Albiero helped the Cardinals to their first-ever ACC Championship. The senior was part of Louisville’s 200 medley relay team that won the Cardinals’ first NCAA relay title. Albiero is a member of the USA National Team, was the 2021 ACC Swimmer of the Year and was a seven-time All-American at the NCAA Championships.

Madden and Albiero are two of the seven total four-time All-ACC Academic honorees on the list. NC State’s Julia Poole and Eric Knowles, Florida State’s Josh Davidson, Louisville’s Nikolaos Sofianidis and Virginia’s Keefer Barnum have all been named to four All-ACC Academic Teams in their careers.

Florida Gold Coast swimmer Jessica Nava, a Westminster Academy alum and member of the reigning NCAA champion Virginia Cavaliers, earned the honor for the second year. The junior is majoring in Commerce.

Another FGC swimmer, Kyla Valls, a Gulliver Prep alum and also a member of the Virginia Cavaliers, secured the honor for a third year. She is majoring in Media Studies.

Florida State junior Izaak Bastian, a St. Andrew’s alum and Bahamas national team member, earned the honor for the third year. He is majoring in Athletic Training.

Minimum academic requirements for selection to the All-ACC Academic Team are a 3.0 grade point average for the previous semester and a 3.0 cumulative average during one’s academic career. Athletic achievements during the most recent season are also considered in selecting the All-ACC Academic Team.

The ACC Honor Roll, which recognizes all conference student-athletes with a grade point average of 3.0 for the current academic year, will be released in July.

CHLORINATED WATER CAN KILL COVID-19

There is now concrete evidence that swimming pools can be safe and secure environments if appropriate measures are taken.

The proper operation of public pools, hot tubs and water playgrounds (such as at an apartment complex or owned by a community) and disinfection of the water (with chlorine or bromine) should inactivate the coronavirus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

A study out of London backs that up saying chances of getting the COVID-19 virus from a swimming pool are “negligible.”

In a study commissioned by Swim England and Water Babies Swim School, with support from the Royal Life Saving Society, virologists from Imperial College London studied what effect varying concentrations of chlorine in water have on the coronavirus.

“By mixing the virus with swimming pool water that was delivered to us by the Water Babies team, we could show that the virus does not survive in swimming pool water, it was no longer infectious,” Wendy Barclay of Imperial College London told the Daily Mail. “That, coupled with the huge dilution factor of virus that might find its way into a swimming pool from an infected person, suggests the chance of contracting COVID-19 from swimming pool water is negligible.”

Although the water should be safe, precautions should still be taken when using a public pool, the CDC said, including wearing a mask and social distancing in addition to not sharing goggles, pool noodles and other equipment with anyone not in your household.

CHLORINE TABLETS SHORTAGE EXPECTED

Chlorine tablets commonly used in backyard swimming pools to keep the water clean may be facing a shortage this summer, which means higher prices for pool owners because of the high demand.

The expected shortage is due in part to a fire destroying a Louisiana factory which accounted for about 80 percent of the nation’s supply.

Now, pool experts say a bucket of chlorine could cost about $200 more than it did this time last year.

Retailers are working on importing chlorine tablets from foreign vendors in China and Europe to keep up with the demand, but customers should still expect a high price tag.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Anthony Nesty Adds Women’s Head Coach Duties To University Of Florida Resume


By Sharon Robb
GAINESVILLE, April 13, 2021–University of Florida women’s swimming and diving team has a familiar face as its new head coach.

Anthony Nesty, 53, after three successful seasons as the men’s swimming and diving head coach at Florida, Nesty will add women’s head coaching duties, Florida Athletic Director Scott Stricklin announced Tuesday.

Nesty replaces Jeff Poppell, women’s head coach from 2018-21, who left to coach South Carolina’s men’s and women’s programs.

The men’s program has won the Southeastern Conference championship all three seasons under Nesty and finished third at the 2021 NCAA Championships. With Nesty helping lead the way, the men’s team has won nine consecutive SEC titles.

Nesty will be coaching South Florida Aquatic Club’s Kathleen Golding and soon her sister Molly. SOFLO teammate Mallory Schleicher has also verbally committed to UF.

“I am honored and excited to be entrusted with the women’s swimming and diving program,” Nesty said. “The men’s and women’s teams have worked closely throughout my time at Florida, and I appreciate the opportunity to lead both programs. We will continue to hold ourselves to the highest standards and push ourselves to be excellent in everything we do.”

The women’s team finished second at the SEC Championships and 17th at NCAA Championships in 2021.

Nesty swam at Florida and was a gold medalist in the 100-meter butterfly at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1998 and UF Athletic Hall of Fame in 2002.

Nesty has been on staff with the Florida swimming and diving program since joining as an assistant coach in 1999. He was promoted to associate head coach in 2006 and stepped in as men’s head coach in 2018 following Gregg Troy, who retired from collegiate coaching.

Florida was a combined program under Troy. Only Texas A&M and Tennessee now have men’s and women’s teams coached by different head coaches in the Southeastern Conference.

“Anthony has proven himself to be an elite head coach with his success, and I know he’ll bring the same passion and abilities to overseeing Florida women’s program as he has the men’s,” Stricklin said in a school news release.

“He has a long and proven track record of bringing out the best in Gator student-athletes and helping them reach their potential athletically, academically and as people. He is the right person to lead our women’s team and push them to achieve at the highest levels.”

Nesty, born in Trinidad & Tobago, remains a legendary national hero in Suriname, a former Dutch colony on the northeast coast of South America. He returned home after the Olympics to receive his nation’s highest honor, the Commander of the Yellow Star. The national indoor 50-meter swimming stadium and national DC-8 airplane were named after him. The Surinam government commemorated him on a stamp and on gold and silver coins.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Former NSU Coach Hollie Bonewit-Cron Named MAC Men’s Coach Of The Year


By Sharon Robb
OXFORD, Ohio, April 12, 2021–Former Nova Southeastern University coach Hollie Bonewit-Cron was named MAC Men’s Coach of the Year after leading Miami University men’s swimming and diving team to the Mid-American Conference Championships.

She asked her staff to accompany her to the awards presentation “because they are as much part of the recognition as I am,” she said.

The host Miami University Redhawks won the men’s title by 245 points this past weekend, defeating defending champion Missouri State, which finished runner-up with 687.

It’s the Redhawks’ second MAC title in three years. Their 2019 win was their first title since 2009. Bonewit-Cron was named both men’s and women’s coach in 2016-17 under a new combined model.

The women’s conference championships are this week, April 15-17, in Ypsilanti, Mich.

Bonewit-Cron wrote on her Facebook page:

“Last March, the news of sporting events being cancelled, facilities being shut down, and figuring out a new semblance of normal was a shock to us all.

“It was months of planning a new training program that centered around safe protocols, testing, masking up, social distancing, and many stipulations that evolved weekly. We also had emergent quarantines (often without notice), one in which forced me to go full mama bear mode.

“Weekly Zoom calls with these amazing athletes and their caring and understanding parents became a normal practice long before we could even re-enter our facility, let alone begin practicing. I am indebted to these parents who understood the struggles of this year and the decisions that had to be made to ensure the safety of their children.

“This past week was nothing short of magical for what seemed to be an unattainable event no less than 6 months ago.

“This team has shown their resiliency and stamina this year. They were gritty, competitive, and steadfast. The freshman on this team have no idea what a normal season looks like since so many things had to change. The upperclassmen, however, knew what it was like and knew how it felt to win a championship two years ago.

“Last year, we all walked off the pool deck with an an indescribable sting, but with that came a commitment to win the next/this year. Little did we know that our training and preparation would be cut in half due to spring and summer shutdowns. Flash forward a year later and I am at a loss in how to describe this incredible feeling.

“I am beyond proud of these athletes who run through brick walls and commit to every aspect with this program. They sacrificed their own wants for the betterment of the team goals. This even included their social life in some ways as well as opportunities to go home to see their families during most of the holidays. They never batted an eye and were always appreciative of every opportunity given to them…even when there was a blanket quarantine.”

Bonewit-Cron coached Nova Southeastern men’s and women’s teams, a program she built from the ground up since its first season of competition in 2010-11.

Joining the NSU staff in 2009, she quickly developed the Shark program into a Division II powerhouse. She also was Grenada’s Olympic coach at the 2012 London Olympics where she coached former NSU standout Esau Simpson to a Grenadian National record.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Texas Longhorns Win NCAA Division 1 Men’s Swimming And Diving Championships


By Sharon Robb
GREENSBORO, N.C., March 27, 2021–On an exciting final day, Texas knocked off defending champion California to win the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championship Saturday at Greensboro Aquatic Center.

Texas, leading by 42 points going into the fourth and final day, took back the title with 595 points. It was the Longhorns and head coach Eddie Reese’s 15th national championship in the program’s history and sixth in the last 11 years.

Reese, the most decorated coach in NCAA history, is in his 43rd season coaching the Longhorns. He has now won a national title in five different decades.

Texas is the first team since Auburn in 2006 to win the men’s national title without winning an individual swimming event. But all 20 of its swimmers scored points in every individual and relay event.

California finished in the top two with 568 points for the 11th consecutive year. Texas was runner-up in 2019. No NCAAs were held in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Before that, Texas won it four consecutive years with California runner-up those four years.

Rounding out the top five teams on Saturday night, University of Florida was third with 367 for its first top four finish since 2017; Georgia was fourth with 268 for its first top four finish since 1997; and Louisville fifth with 211 for the second consecutive year. University of Miami was 19th with 54 points. Florida State was 23rd with 32.5.

Florida junior Bobby Finke won the 1,650-yard freestyle in a meet and pool record 14:12.52. The meet record was 14:22.41 set by Clark Smith of Texas in 2017. The pool record was 14:23.52 set by Connor Jaeger of Club Wolverine in 2014.

Texas A&M junior Shaine Casas won the 200-yard backstroke in 1:35.75, breaking the pool record of 1:37.19 set in morning prelims by Cal’s Destin Lasco, who finished second in finals in 1:35.99.

Cal senior Ryan Hoffer won the 100-yard freestyle in a pool record 40.89 breaking his own pool record set in prelims in 40.90. Florida’s Kieran Smith was sixth in 41.89.

Minnesota junior Max McHugh won the 200-yard breaststroke in a pool record 1:49.02. The previous pool record was 1:49.87 set by Cal’s Reece Whitley, second at night in 1:49.54.

Florida State junior Izaak Bastian, a St. Andrew’s alum and Bahamas national team member, was 36th in the 200 breaststroke in 1:56.50.

Louisville senior Nicolas Albiero, son of Louisville head coach Arthur Albiero, won the 200-yard butterfly in a pool record 1:38.64. He broke his own pool record set in prelims in 1:38.65.

In the men’s platform diving, Purdue senior Brandon Loschiavo won with 469.05 points. Miami’s Zach Cooper was third with 442.65. Former Fort Lauderale diver Jordan Windle of Texas was fourth with 422.75 points. Windle scored the most points for the Longhorns with 52.

With Texas leading 37 points going into the relay, California (Bjorn Seeliger, Ryan Hoffer, Destin Lasco, Hugo Gonzalez) came from behind to win the 400-yard freestyle relay in 2:46.60. Florida (Adam Cheney, Kieran Smith, Eric Friese, Trey Freeman) was second in 2:46.88. Texas (Daniel Krueger, Chris Staka, Jake Sannem, Drew Kibler) finished fourth in 2:48.28.

A total of 235 swimmers from 41 teams competed.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s championships looked a lot different, much like last week’s women’s NCAAs.

Due to the mass gathering restrictions in place in North Carolina, spectators were not allowed to attend the meet including parents, family members and friends.

There was no participant seating on the pool deck. All teams and individuals were assigned seating in the grandstand seating area.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Texas Regains Lead After Day Three Of NCAA Division 1 Men’s Swimming And Diving Championship


By Sharon Robb
GREENSBORO, N.C., March 26, 2021–Defending champion California and Texas are still locked in a battle after three days of competition in the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championship at Greensboro Aquatic Center.

Texas regained the lead with 414 points. All 16 of its swimmers have made at least one final and scored. Defending national champion California dropped to second with 372 points. University of Florida is third with 282.

University of Miami is tied with Tennessee for 18th with 38 points. Florida State is 23rd with 24.5.

Florida State junior Izaak Bastian, a St. Andrew’s alum and Bahamas national team member, was 19th in the 100-yard breaststroke in 52.29, off his best time of 51.84.

Indiana diver Andrew Capobianco knocked off former Fort Lauderdale diver Jordan Windle of Texas for the 3-meter springboard title. Capobianco finished with 505.20 points and Windle had 484.60. Miami sophomore Brodie Scapens was fifth with 413.75. Miami freshman teammate Jack Matthews was 121th with 389.85.

In swimming action, Florida junior Bobby Finke opened with a win in the 400-yard individual medley in a pool record 3:36.90. The pool record was first broken in prelims by Texas freshman Carson Foster in 3:37.79.

California senior Ryan Hoffer won the 100-yard butterfly in 44.25, his second win of the meet.

Florida junior Kieran Smith won the 200-yard freestyle in 1:30.10 just ahead of Texas junior Drew Kibler in 1:30.39.

Minnesota junior Max McHugh won the 100-yard breaststroke in a pool record 50.87. McHugh is a great comeback story after recovering from a gunshot injury in 2019.

Texas A&M junior Shaine Casas won the 100-yard backstroke in 44.20 ahead of N.C. State sophomore Kacper Stokowski in 44.37.

Louisville pulled off a win in the 200-yard medley relay in a pool record 1:22.11 with Mitchell Whyte, Evgeni Somov, Nicolas Albiero and Haridi Sameh.

Florida was second in 1:22.41 with Adam Chaney, Dillon Hillis, Eric Friese and Will Davis. Chaney had a 20.55 opening split.

A total of 235 swimmers from 41 teams are competing. California is defending champion and Texas was runner-up in 2019. No NCAAs were held in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Before that, Texas won it four consecutive years with California runner-up those four years.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s championships looks a lot different, much like last week’s women’s NCAAs.

Due to the mass gathering restrictions in place in North Carolina, spectators were not allowed to attend the meet including parents, family members and friends.

There is no participant seating on the pool deck. All teams and individuals were assigned seating in the grandstand seating area.

The meet is airing on ESPN3 for both preliminary and finals sessions.

Saturday’s events are: 200-yard backstroke, 100-yard freestyle, 200-yard breaststroke, 200-yard butterfly, platform diving, 1,650-yard freestyle and 400-yard freestyle relay.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Former Fort Lauderdale Diver Jordan Windle Wins 1-Meter; California Takes Lead At NCAA Division 1 Men’s Swimming And Diving Championship


By Sharon Robb
GREENSBORO, N.C., March 25, 2021–Defending champion California overtook opening day leader and chief rival Texas Thursday in the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championship at Greensboro Aquatic Center.

The Cal Bears lead with 230 points followed by Texas with 203 and University of Florida with 161 points. University of Miami is 19th with 19 points and Florida State is 20th with 18.5.

Texas senior Jordan Windle, who grew up in Fort Lauderdale, won the 1-meter springboard title with 435.60 points, bettering his prelim total of 379.30. It was Texas’ first 1-meter title since 2012. Longhorns freshman teammate Noah Duperre was second with 405.45. The pair totaled 37 points. University of Miami sophomore Brodie Scapens was seventh with 337.15 points and freshman teammate Jack Matthews was tenth with 342.65 points.

Defending national champion California opened the night with a win in the 200-yard freestyle relay in a pool record 1:14.36 with relay members Bjorn Seeliger, Ryan Hoffer, Daniel Carr and Nate Biondi, oldest son of 11-time Olympic medalist and one of Cal’s most accomplished athletes, Matt Biondi.

Top-seed Florida was second in 1:14.48 with Adam Chaney, Will Davis, Kieran Smith and Eric Friese, who had an 18.38 anchor split and nearly reeled in Biondi. Florida State was 15th in 1:17.07 with Peter Varjasi, Kuba Ksiazek, Mason Herbet and Max McCusker.

Georgia freshman Jake Magahey won the 500-yard freestyle in a meet record 4:07.97. He was the only freshman in the Top 16. The previous mark was 4:08.19 set by Townley Haas of Texas in 2019.

Smith, a junior, came back after the relay to finish second in the 500-yard freestyle in 4:08.07, also breaking the meet record. Gator teammates Bobby Finke was sixth in 4:11.11, Trey Freeman was 11th in 4:12.21 and Alfonso Mestre was 14th in 4:14.97 for 39 total points.

Texas A&M junior Shaine Casas won the 200-yard individual medley in 1:39.53. Cal junior Hugo Gonzalez was second in 1:39.99 and Bears freshman teammate Destin Lasco was third in 1:40.01. The top three finishers all dipped below the previous pool record of 1:40.61 set in prelims by Lasco.

Cal senior Ryan Hoffer won the 50-yard freestyle in 18.33, breaking his own pool record of 18.43 set in morning prelims. Cal freshman Bjorn Seeliger was second in 18.71 and Florida freshman Adam Chaney was third in 18.88.

In the final event of the night, Texas edged California in the 400-yard medley relay. The Longhorns won in a pool record 3:00.23 with Chris Staka, Caspar Corbeau, Alvin Jiang and Daniel Krueger. The Bears were a close second in 3:00.73 with Destin Lasco, Reece Whitley, Ryan Hoffer and Bjorn Seeliger. Florida was third in 3:01.51 with Adam Cheney, Dillon Hillis, Eric Friese and workhorse Smith. Florida State was 11th in 3:04.83 with St. Andrew’s alum Izaak Bastian swimming the second leg in a 51.31 split.

Bastian, a Bahamian national team member, will compete in the 100 breaststroke on Friday.

A total of 235 swimmers from 41 teams are competing. California is defending champion and Texas was runner-up in 2019. No NCAAs were held in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Before that, Texas won it four consecutive years with California runner-up those four years.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s championships looks a lot different, much like last week’s women’s NCAAs.

Due to the mass gathering restrictions in place in North Carolina, spectators were not allowed to attend the meet including parents, family members and friends.

There is no participant seating on the pool deck. All teams and individuals were assigned seating in the grandstand seating area.

The meet is airing on ESPN3 for both preliminary and finals sessions.

Friday’s events are: 400-yard individual medley, 100-yard butterfly, 200-yard freestyle, 100-yard breaststroke, 100-yard backstroke, 200-yard medley relay and 3-meter diving.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

Texas Opens NCAA Division 1 Men’s Swimming And Diving Championship With A Relay Win


By Sharon Robb
GREENSBORO, N.C., March 23, 2021–University of Texas got on the scoreboard first Wednesday in the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championship at Greensboro Aquatic Center.

The Longhorns won the 800-yard freestyle relay in a pool record 6:07.25 with Drew Kibler, Austin Katz, Carson Foster and Jake Sannem.

Defending national champion California was second in 6:08.68 with Trenton Julian, Daniel Carr, Destin Lasco and Bryce Mefford. Texas A&M was third in 6:10.79.

University of Florida was fourth in 6:10.91 with Kieran Smith, Troy Freeman, Alfonso Mestre and Bobby Finke.

The top four teams all finished under the previous pool record of 6:11.84 set in 2019 by Louisville.

A total of 235 swimmers from 41 teams are competing. California is defending champion and Texas was runner-up in 2019. Before that, Texas won it four consecutive years with California runner-up those four years.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s championships will look a lot different, much like last week’s women’s NCAAs.

Due to the mass gathering restrictions in place in North Carolina, spectators are not allowed to attend the meet including parents, family members and friends.

There is no participant seating on the pool deck. All teams and individuals were assigned seating in the grandstand seating area.

The meet is airing on ESPN3 for both preliminary and finals sessions.

Thursday’s events are 200-yard freestyle relay, 500-yard freestyle, 200-yard individual medley, 50-yard freestyle, 1-meter diving and 400-yard medley relay.

ELSEWHERE

ST. PETERSBURG—Six-time Olympian Ryan Lochte held off Caeleb Dressel in the 200-meter individual medley and won the 100-meter backstroke in the ISCA TYR International Senior Cup Wednesday at North Shore Aquatic Complex.

Lochte, 36, training for his fifth Olympic Games, won the 200 IM in 1:59.72 ahead of Gator Swim Club teammates Dressel was second in 2:00.50. He won the 100 backstroke in 55.92.

Dressel won the 50-meter butterfly in 23.98 and Singapore Olympic gold medalist Joseph Schooling tied Will Davis for second in 24.08.

Erika Pelaez, 14, of Eagle Aquatics won the 16-and-under 100-meter backstroke in 1:01.88. Cornell grad Ilya Evdokimov, 25, of Pinnacle (Va.) Racing won the men’s 100-meter breaststroke in 1:02.04. Evdokimov is a Florida Gold Coast swimmer who competed for Taravella High School and Coral Springs Swim Club.

SOFLO will compete in the ISCA East Elite Showcase Classic March 31-April 3.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com

NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming And Diving Championships Begin Wednesday; St. Andrew’s Izaak Bastian Among Field; Miami Sends Four Divers


By Sharon Robb
GREENSBORO, N.C., March 23, 2021–University of California and Texas are expected to battle it out again for the men’s title at the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championships that begin Wednesday and run through Saturday at Greensboro Aquatic Center.

The meet is expected to come down to the final relay and diving which is the Longhorns’ strength with Fort Lauderdale diver Jordan Windle, a Team USA, NCAA champion and six-time All-American.

Texas has the most qualifiers with 18, California has 15 qualifiers and seeded to score the most points. N.C. State has 14, Georgia, 13 and University of Florida, 12.

Florida’s Kieran Smith is seeded first in the 200- (1:29.48) and 500- (4:06.32) yard freestyle relay. Teammates Bobby Finke is seeded first in the 1,650-yard freestyle (14:12.18) and Adam Chaney is seeded first in the 50-yard freestyle (18.76). Florida is seeded first in the 200-yard freestyle relay in 1:15.21.

University of Miami has the most divers qualified with four: Zach Cooper, Maxwell Flory, Jack Matthews and Brodie Scapens.

According to scoring projections, California has 449, Texas 428 and Florida 323.5 points.

Florida State has eight swimmers competing including St. Andrew’s alum Izaak Bastian, a junior, who represents the Bahamas internationally. He will compete in the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke.

A total of 235 swimmers from 41 teams are competing. California is defending champion and Texas was runner-up in 2019. Before that, Texas won it four consecutive years with California runner-up those four years.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s championships will look a lot different, much like last week’s women’s NCAAs.

Due to the mass gathering restrictions in place in North Carolina, spectators will not be allowed to attend the meet including parents, family members and friends.

There will be no participant seating on the pool deck. All teams and individuals will be assigned seating in the grandstand seating area. A team seating selection process will be conducted to allow the top 15 teams from the 2019 championship to select their seating in the grandstands.

The meet will air on ESPN3 for both preliminary and finals sessions.

Thursday’s event is the 800-yard freestyle relay at 6 p.m.

Sharon Robb can be reached at sha11cats@aol.com
http://www.swim4soflo.com